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Effects of norms, warm-glow and time use on household recycling

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Abstract

The aim of this paper is to quantify the relative importance of motivations based on warm-glow, social and moral norms and cost of time used recycling on household recycling efforts. We also test for crowding-out of intrinsic motivations when recycling is perceived as mandatory. We find that the most important variable increasing household recycling efforts is agreeing that recycling is a pleasant activity in itself, which may be interpreted as a warm-glow effect. The most important variable reducing household recycling is the opportunity cost of time spent recycling. We find no evidence of crowding-out of intrinsic motivation when recycling is perceived as mandatory. On the contrary, we find that governmental legislation increases household recycling efforts on most materials.

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  • Bente Halvorsen, 2004. "Effects of norms, warm-glow and time use on household recycling," Discussion Papers 389, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
  • Handle: RePEc:ssb:dispap:389
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    File URL: http://www.ssb.no/a/publikasjoner/pdf/DP/dp389.pdf
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    1. Frey, Bruno S., 1993. "Motivation as a limit to pricing," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 14(4), pages 635-664, December.
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    Keywords

    Contingent valuation method; cost of time; household recycling; moral and social norms; ordered probit; simultaneous estimation of discrete- and continuous choice; warm-glow; crowding out.;

    JEL classification:

    • C20 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - General
    • C35 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions
    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • D60 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - General
    • H42 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods - - - Publicly Provided Private Goods
    • H79 - Public Economics - - State and Local Government; Intergovernmental Relations - - - Other
    • Q29 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Other

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