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Facts, Alternative Facts, and Fact Checking in Times of Post-Truth Politics

Author

Listed:
  • Oscar Barrera

    (Ecole d'Économie de Paris - Paris School of Economics (PSE))

  • Sergei Guriev

    (Département d'économie)

  • Emeric Henry

    (Département d'économie)

  • Ekaterina Zhuravskaya

    (Ecole d'Économie de Paris - Paris School of Economics)

Abstract

How effective is fact checking in countervailing “alternative facts,” i.e., misleading statements by politicians? In a randomized online experiment during the 2017 French presidential election campaign, we subjected subgroups of 2480 French voters to alternative facts by the extreme-right candidate, Marine Le Pen, and/or corresponding facts about the European refugee crisis from official sources. We find that: (i) alter- native facts are highly persuasive; (ii) fact checking improves factual knowledge of voters (iii) but it does not affect policy conclusions or support for the candidate; (iv) exposure to facts alone does not decrease support for the candidate, even though voters update their knowledge. We argue that the main channel is that fact checking increases the salience of the immigration issue.

Suggested Citation

  • Oscar Barrera & Sergei Guriev & Emeric Henry & Ekaterina Zhuravskaya, 2018. "Facts, Alternative Facts, and Fact Checking in Times of Post-Truth Politics," Sciences Po Economics Discussion Papers 2018-09, Sciences Po Departement of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:spo:wpecon:info:hdl:2441/1dhd1b1s319fbai85khk40fudc
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    References listed on IDEAS

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