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Renewable energy policy in the presence of innovation: does government pre-commitment matter?

  • Reinhard Madlener

    ()

    (Institute for Future Energy Consumer Needs and Behavior (FCN), RWTH Aachen University)

  • Ilja Neustadt

    ()

    (Socioeconomic Institute, University of Zurich)

In a perfectly competitive market with a possibility of technological innovation we contrast guaranteed feed-in tariffs for electricity from renewables and tradable green certificates from a dynamic efficiency and social welfare point of view. Specifically, we model decisions about the technological innovation with convex costs within the framework of a game-theoretic model, and discuss implications for optimal policy design under different assumptions regarding regulatory pre-commitment. We find that for the case of technological innovation with convex costs subsidy policies are preferable over quota-based policies. Further, in terms of dynamic efficiency, no pre-commitment policies are shown to be at least as good as the pre-commitment ones. Thus, a government with a preference for innovation being performed if the achievable cost reduction is high should be in favor of the no pre-commitment regime.

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File URL: http://www.soi.uzh.ch/research/wp/2010/wp1010.pdf
File Function: first version, 2010
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Paper provided by Socioeconomic Institute - University of Zurich in its series SOI - Working Papers with number 1010.

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Length: 40 pages
Date of creation: Sep 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:soz:wpaper:1010
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  8. Nilsson, Mats & Sundqvist, Thomas, 2007. "Using the market at a cost: How the introduction of green certificates in Sweden led to market inefficiencies," Utilities Policy, Elsevier, vol. 15(1), pages 49-59, March.
  9. Amundsen, E.S. & Mortensen, J.B., 2001. "The Danish Green Certificate System: Some Simple Analytical Results," Norway; Department of Economics, University of Bergen 226, Department of Economics, University of Bergen.
  10. Nielsen, Lene & Jeppesen, Tim, 2003. "Tradable Green Certificates in selected European countries--overview and assessment," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 3-14, January.
  11. Weiyu Gao & Reinhard Madlener & Peter Zweifel, 2005. "Promoting renewable electricity generation in imperfect markets: price vs. quantity control," CEPE Working paper series 05-45, CEPE Center for Energy Policy and Economics, ETH Zurich.
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  13. Amundsen, Eirik S. & Nese, Gjermund, 2002. "Provision of renewable energy using green certificates: market power and price limits," MPRA Paper 10558, University Library of Munich, Germany.
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