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The Faster-Accelerating Growth of the Knowledge-Based Society

Author

Listed:
  • Tai-Yoo Kim

    () (College of Engineering, Seoul National University)

  • Mi-Ae Jung

    () (Science and Technology Policy Institute)

  • Eungdo Kim

    () (College of Engineering, Seoul National University)

  • Eunnyeong Heo

    () (College of Engineering, Seoul National University)

Abstract

The first contribution of this study is to identify the economic growth patterns of the emerging knowledge-based society of the future, compared to the agricultural society or the industrial society, by analyzing the aspects of future technologies and new humankind and their effects on the value creation structure. The second contribution of this study is to highlight the characteristics of the new humankind in a knowledge-based society. A number of studies related to economic growth from the long and macro perspective have considered only the conventional aspects of individual humans—for example, a rational consumer or a labor supplier—but this study has considered newly emerging groups with different socio-economic characteristics and their effects on the economy and society.

Suggested Citation

  • Tai-Yoo Kim & Mi-Ae Jung & Eungdo Kim & Eunnyeong Heo, 2011. "The Faster-Accelerating Growth of the Knowledge-Based Society," TEMEP Discussion Papers 201181, Seoul National University; Technology Management, Economics, and Policy Program (TEMEP), revised Nov 2011.
  • Handle: RePEc:snv:dp2009:201181
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Knowledge-based society; future technology; digital native; active senior; economic growth; faster acceleration.;

    JEL classification:

    • L16 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Industrial Organization and Macroeconomics; Macroeconomic Industrial Structure
    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • O47 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Empirical Studies of Economic Growth; Aggregate Productivity; Cross-Country Output Convergence

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