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Unhappiness in unemployment – is it the same for everyone?

Author

Listed:
  • Simonetta Longhi

    () (University of Reading)

  • Alita Nandi

    () (University of Essex)

  • Mark Bryan

    () (University of Sheffield)

  • Sara Connolly

    () (University of East Anglia)

  • Cigdem Gedikli

    (University of Hertfordshire)

Abstract

Many studies have shown that there is a general tendency for men’s subjective wellbeing to be more badly affected by unemployment when compared to women, although the extent varies across countries. The existing literature notes the gender differences and offers possible explanations, but does not formally compare competing hypotheses. We analyse whether gender differences in life satisfaction associated with the experience of unemployment can be attributed to degrees of specialisation in the labour market, differences in the types of work undertaken by men and women, differences in personality traits, work identity or gender norms. We find that it is not all, but some, women who suffer less than men when experiencing a transition into unemployment. The experience of unemployment for women is differentiated by pay, work identity and, most powerfully, gender attitudes.

Suggested Citation

  • Simonetta Longhi & Alita Nandi & Mark Bryan & Sara Connolly & Cigdem Gedikli, 2018. "Unhappiness in unemployment – is it the same for everyone?," Working Papers 2018007, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:shf:wpaper:2018007
    as

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    File URL: http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/economics/research/serps/articles/2018_007
    File Function: First version, May 2018
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    gender attitudes; life satisfaction; unemployment; wellbeing;

    JEL classification:

    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search

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