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Part time employment and happiness: A cross-country analysis

Author

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  • Pamela Lenton

    () (Department of Economics, The University of Sheffield)

Abstract

This paper analyses levels of over-education and wage returns to education for males across eleven regions of the UK using Labour Force Survey data. Significant differences are found in the probability of being over-educated across regions; also, differences are found in the return to the ‘correct’ level of education in each region, in each case associated with flexibility of movement between and into particular regions, which determines the ease of job matching. Furthermore, evidence is found that, after controlling for the level of education acquired, there exists a premium to the ‘correct’ level of education, which varies across UK regions.

Suggested Citation

  • Pamela Lenton, 2011. "Part time employment and happiness: A cross-country analysis," Working Papers 2011001, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics, revised Jan 2011.
  • Handle: RePEc:shf:wpaper:2011001
    as

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    File URL: http://www.shef.ac.uk/economics/research/serps/articles/2011_001.html
    File Function: First version, 2011
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. H. Battu & P. J. Sloane, 2004. "Over-Education and Ethnic Minorities in Britain," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 72(4), pages 535-559, July.
    2. Richard R. Verdugo & Naomi Turner Verdugo, 1989. "The Impact of Surplus Schooling on Earnings: Some Additional Findings," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 24(4), pages 629-643.
    3. Groeneveld, Sandra & Hartog, Joop, 2004. "Overeducation, wages and promotions within the firm," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 11(6), pages 701-714, December.
    4. Dieter Verhaest & Eddy Omey, 2010. "The determinants of overeducation: different measures, different outcomes?," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 31(6), pages 608-625, September.
    5. Dolton, Peter & Vignoles, Anna, 2000. "The incidence and effects of overeducation in the U.K. graduate labour market," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 179-198, April.
    6. Green, Colin & Kler, Parvinder & Leeves, Gareth, 2007. "Immigrant overeducation: Evidence from recent arrivals to Australia," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 26(4), pages 420-432, August.
    7. Rubb, S., 2003. "Overeducation in the labor market: a comment and re-analysis of a meta-analysis," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 22(6), pages 621-629, December.
    8. Raul Ramos & Jordi Surinach & Manuel Artís, 2012. "Regional Economic Growth and Human Capital: The Role of Over-education," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 46(10), pages 1389-1400, November.
    9. Nigel O'leary & Peter Sloane, 2008. "Rates of Return to Degrees across British Regions," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(2), pages 199-213.
    10. Lindley, Joanne, 2009. "The over-education of UK immigrants and minority ethnic groups: Evidence from the Labour Force Survey," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 80-89, February.
    11. Joanne Kathryn Lindley & Pamela Lenton, 2006. "The Over-Education of UK Immigrants: Evidence from the Labour Force Survey," Working Papers 2006001, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics, revised Jan 2006.
    12. McGuinness, Seamus & Bennett, Jessica, 2007. "Overeducation in the graduate labour market: A quantile regression approach," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 26(5), pages 521-531, October.
    13. Don J. Webber & John Hudson & Martin Boddy & Anthony Plumridge, 2009. "Regional productivity differentials in England: Explaining the gap," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 88(3), pages 609-621, August.
    14. Groot, Wim & Maassen van den Brink, Henriette, 2000. "Overeducation in the labor market: a meta-analysis," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 149-158, April.
    15. Buchel, Felix & van Ham, Maarten, 2003. "Overeducation, regional labor markets, and spatial flexibility," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(3), pages 482-493, May.
    16. Tony Champion & Mike Coombes, 2007. "Using the 2001 census to study human capital movements affecting Britain's larger cities: insights and issues," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 170(2), pages 447-467.
    17. Sicherman, Nachum, 1991. ""Overeducation" in the Labor Market," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 9(2), pages 101-122, April.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    education; returns;

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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