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House Prices and Immovable Property Taxes: Evidence from OECD Countries

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Abstract

In this paper we study the impact of changes in immovable property taxation on the growth rate of house prices by analyzing a panel of 34 OECD countries over the period 1970-2014. We show that there is a negative relationship, robust to the inclusion of other cyclical determinants of house prices, country and year fixed effects. Furthermore, we do not find evidence of a stabilizing role of immovable property taxes on the variability of house prices: boom-bust cycles in housing markets are, in fact, not correlated with the levels of such a tax.

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  • Tommaso Oliviero & Agnese Sacchi & Annalisa Scognamiglio & Alberto Zazzaro, 2016. "House Prices and Immovable Property Taxes: Evidence from OECD Countries," CSEF Working Papers 444, Centre for Studies in Economics and Finance (CSEF), University of Naples, Italy, revised 06 Oct 2016.
  • Handle: RePEc:sef:csefwp:444
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    Keywords

    House prices; Immovable property tax.;

    JEL classification:

    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy
    • H20 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - General
    • R21 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Housing Demand
    • R31 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Real Estate Markets, Spatial Production Analysis, and Firm Location - - - Housing Supply and Markets

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