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Tax structure and growth: How robust is the empirical evidence?

  • Xing, Jing
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    This paper examines the link between the composition of tax revenues and the level of income per capita in the long run. I find that the “tax and growth ranking” suggested by some recent empirical studies is not robust under different assumptions about heterogeneity across countries of the long-run and short-run coefficients in the underlying econometric model. Evidence for significant tax structure effects depends on long-run parameter homogeneity restrictions, underlying pooled mean group estimation, which are found to be invalid.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0165176512003229
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics Letters.

    Volume (Year): 117 (2012)
    Issue (Month): 1 ()
    Pages: 379-382

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:117:y:2012:i:1:p:379-382
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ecolet

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    1. Kneller, Richard & Bleaney, Michael F. & Gemmell, Norman, 1999. "Fiscal policy and growth: evidence from OECD countries," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 74(2), pages 171-190, November.
    2. Christopher Heady & Åsa Johansson & Jens Arnold & Bert Brys & Laura Vartia, 2009. "Tax Policy for Economic Recovery and Growth," Studies in Economics 0925, School of Economics, University of Kent.
    3. Jing Xing, 2011. "Does tax structure affect economic growth? Empirical evidence from OECD countries," Working Papers 1120, Oxford University Centre for Business Taxation.
    4. J. A. Hausman, 1976. "Specification Tests in Econometrics," Working papers 185, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
    5. Steve Bond & Asli Leblebicioglu & Fabio Schiantarelli, 2004. "Capital Accumulation and Growth: A New Look at the Empirical Evidence," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 591, Boston College Department of Economics, revised 02 Aug 2007.
    6. Widmalm, Frida, 2001. " Tax Structure and Growth: Are Some Taxes Better Than Others?," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 107(3-4), pages 199-219, June.
    7. M. Hashem Pesaran, 2006. "Estimation and Inference in Large Heterogeneous Panels with a Multifactor Error Structure," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 74(4), pages 967-1012, 07.
    8. Lee, Young & Gordon, Roger H., 2005. "Tax structure and economic growth," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 89(5-6), pages 1027-1043, June.
    9. Pesaran, M.H. & Smith, R., 1992. "Estimating Long-Run Relationships From Dynamic Heterogeneous Panels," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 9215, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
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