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Short-Selling Bans and Bank Stability

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Abstract

In both the subprime crisis and the euro-area crisis, regulators imposed bans on short sales, aimed mainly at preventing stock price turbulence from destabilizing financial institutions. Contrary to the regulators’ intentions, financial institutions whose stocks were banned experienced greater increases in the probability of default and volatility than unbanned ones, and these increases were larger for more vulnerable financial institutions. To take into account the endogeneity of short sales bans, we match banned financial institutions with unbanned ones of similar size and riskiness, and instrument the 2011 ban decisions with regulators’ propensity to impose a ban in the 2008 crisis.

Suggested Citation

  • Alessandro Beber & Daniela Fabbri & Marco Pagano & Saverio Simonelli, 2015. "Short-Selling Bans and Bank Stability," CSEF Working Papers 423, Centre for Studies in Economics and Finance (CSEF), University of Naples, Italy, revised 15 Dec 2017.
  • Handle: RePEc:sef:csefwp:423
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    Cited by:

    1. Bohl, Martin T. & Reher, Gerrit & Wilfling, Bernd, 2016. "Short selling constraints and stock returns volatility: Empirical evidence from the German stock market," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 159-166.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    short selling; ban; financial crisis; bank stability; systemic risk;

    JEL classification:

    • G01 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Financial Crises
    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates
    • G14 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Information and Market Efficiency; Event Studies; Insider Trading
    • G18 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Government Policy and Regulation

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