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The Wig and the Pith Helmet - the Impact of "Legal School" versus Colonial Institutions on Economic Performance (second version)

Author

Listed:
  • Jacek Rostowski
  • Bogdan Stacescu

Abstract

The difference between common law and French civil law countries fails to have a statistically significant effect on economic growth, whereas the difference between British and French colonies has a strong effect when the two pairs of institutional variables are included separately in regressions. Moreover, when both pairs of variables are included together, the impact of the difference in legal school becomes highly insignificant, whereas the difference in colonial origin continues to be highly significant. Throughout we control for fundamental environmental and historical variables. Thus, we find that certain objective markers of historically based institutional differences do have an important impact on economic growth. We also find evidence that the incidence of malaria is endogenous to economic development. Our results have implications for the "geography vs. institutions" and "policies vs. institutions" debates on the deep determinants of economic growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Jacek Rostowski & Bogdan Stacescu, 2006. "The Wig and the Pith Helmet - the Impact of "Legal School" versus Colonial Institutions on Economic Performance (second version)," CASE Network Studies and Analyses 0300, CASE-Center for Social and Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:sec:cnstan:0300
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    File URL: http://www.case-research.eu/upload/publikacja_plik/11160774_sa300.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Rafael La Porta & Florencio Lopez-de-Silanes & Cristian Pop-Eleches & Andrei Shleifer, 2004. "Judicial Checks and Balances," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 112(2), pages 445-470, April.
    2. Dani Rodrik & Arvind Subramanian & Francesco Trebbi, 2004. "Institutions Rule: The Primacy of Institutions Over Geography and Integration in Economic Development," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 9(2), pages 131-165, June.
    3. Grier, Robin M, 1999. "Colonial Legacies and Economic Growth," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 98(3-4), pages 317-335, March.
    4. Daron Acemoglu & Simon Johnson & James A. Robinson, 2002. "Reversal of Fortune: Geography and Institutions in the Making of the Modern World Income Distribution," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 117(4), pages 1231-1294.
    5. Edward L. Glaeser & Rafael La Porta & Florencio Lopez-de-Silanes & Andrei Shleifer, 2004. "Do Institutions Cause Growth?," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 9(3), pages 271-303, September.
    6. Daron Acemoglu & Simon Johnson, 2005. "Unbundling Institutions," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 113(5), pages 949-995, October.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. J.A. Agbor & J. W. Fedderke & N. Viegi, 2010. "How Does Colonial Origin Matter for Economic Performance in sub-Saharan Africa?," Working Papers 176, Economic Research Southern Africa.
    2. Andrés Blanco Blanco & Vicente Fretes Cibils & Andrés Muñoz Miranda & Alan Gilbert & Steven Webb & Eduardo Reese & Florencia Almansi & Julieta del Valle & Suzana Pasternak & Camila D’Ottaviano & Isabe, 2014. "Rental Housing Wanted: Options for Expanding Housing Policy," IDB Publications (Books), Inter-American Development Bank, number 87354 edited by Andrés Blanco Blanco & Vicente Fretes Cibils & Andrés Muñoz Miranda, February.
    3. repec:idb:idbbks:6730 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Andrei Shleifer & Florencio Lopez-de-Silanes & Rafael La Porta, 2008. "The Economic Consequences of Legal Origins," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 46(2), pages 285-332, June.
    5. Kyriacou, Andreas P., 2016. "Individualism–collectivism, governance and economic development," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 91-104.
    6. Babacar Sarr, 2016. "What Are the Drivers of Fiscal Performance Gaps between Anglophone and Francophone Africa? A Blinder–Oaxaca Decomposition," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 84(1), pages 40-62, March.
    7. C. Dannemann & Erkan Goeren, 2018. "The Educational Burden of ADHD: Evidence From Student Achievement Test Scores," Working Papers V-408-18, University of Oldenburg, Department of Economics, revised Apr 2018.

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