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Institutional Transplants in the Transformation of Poland's Economy and Polity


  • Jacek Rostowski


The collapse of communism faced Poland and other former Soviet bloc countries with the need for a massive “institutional refit”, as regards both economic and political institutions. This paper describes where some of the key new institutions were derived from (either in the form of transplants from other countries, revivals of pre-communist domestic institutions or completely new local “institutional innovations”), and proposes some tentative views as to why the particular developments we observe took place, and whether they corresponded to needs at the time. In the case of transplants, we attempt to explain why these were copied from one particular country rather than from others.

Suggested Citation

  • Jacek Rostowski, 2007. "Institutional Transplants in the Transformation of Poland's Economy and Polity," CASE Network Studies and Analyses 0339, CASE-Center for Social and Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:sec:cnstan:0339

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Rafael La Porta & Florencio Lopez-de-Silanes & Cristian Pop-Eleches & Andrei Shleifer, 2004. "Judicial Checks and Balances," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 112(2), pages 445-470, April.
    2. Glaeser, Edward L. & Saks, Raven E., 2006. "Corruption in America," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 90(6-7), pages 1053-1072, August.
    3. Edward L. Glaeser & Rafael La Porta & Florencio Lopez-de-Silanes & Andrei Shleifer, 2004. "Do Institutions Cause Growth?," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 9(3), pages 271-303, September.
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