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Recent Trends in Youth Labour Markets and Youth Employment Policy in Europe and Central Asia

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Abstract

This paper discusses the nature and characteristics of the youth labour market in Europe and Central Asia. The central concern is with the policy response to the substantial youth unemploymen problem emerging with the transition to the market in Central & Eastern Europe and Central Asia (CEECA). After looking at general trends in youth labour markets, in particular the impact of the recessions and the rapid industrial restructuring which accompanied transition, the paper outlines recent developments in youth employment policy at national and international levels and reviews findings on the contributions of policy to both improving youth employment prospects (education and ALMP) and, potentially, reducing them (minimum wages and employment protection legislation).

Suggested Citation

  • Niall O’Higgins, 2004. "Recent Trends in Youth Labour Markets and Youth Employment Policy in Europe and Central Asia," CELPE Discussion Papers 85, CELPE - Centre of Labour Economics and Economic Policy, University of Salerno, Italy.
  • Handle: RePEc:sal:celpdp:85
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Vodopivec, Milan & Worgotter, Andreas & Raju, Dhushyanth, 2003. "Unemployment benefit systems in Central and Eastern Europe : a review of the 1990s," Social Protection and Labor Policy and Technical Notes 26307, The World Bank.
    2. Niall O'Higgins, 2005. "Trends in the Youth Labour Market in Developing and Transition Countries," Labor and Demography 0507002, EconWPA.
    3. Paul Gregg & Emma Tominey, 2004. "The Wage Scar from Youth Unemployment," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 04/097, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
    4. Beleva, Iskra, 2001. "Targeting Youth Employment Policy in Bulgaria," MPRA Paper 60272, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. O'Higgins, Niall, 2001. "Youth unemployment and employment policy: a global perspective," MPRA Paper 23698, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Martina Lubyova & Jan C. van Ours, 1999. "Unemployment durations of job losers in a labour market in transition," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 7(3), pages 665-686, November.
    7. Sandrine Cazes & Stefano Scarpetta, 1998. "Labour market transitions and unemployment duration: Evidence from Bulgarian and Polish micro-data," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 6(1), pages 113-144, May.
    8. Niall O'Higgins, 2005. "The Challenge of Youth Unemployment," Labor and Demography 0507003, EconWPA.
    9. Sanders Korenman & David Neumark, 2000. "Cohort Crowding and Youth Labor Markets (A Cross-National Analysis)," NBER Chapters,in: Youth Employment and Joblessness in Advanced Countries, pages 57-106 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Fretwell, David H. & Benus, Jacob & O'Leary, Christopher J., 1999. "Evaluating the impact of active labor programs : results of cross country studies in Europe and Central Asia," Social Protection and Labor Policy and Technical Notes 20131, The World Bank.
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    Cited by:

    1. Pastore, Francesco, 2005. "To Study or to Work? Education and Labour Market Participation of Young People in Poland," IZA Discussion Papers 1793, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Fares, Jean & Tiongson, Erwin R., 2007. "Youth unemployment, labor market transitions, and scarring : evidence from Bosnia and Herzegovina, 2001-04," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4183, The World Bank.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Transition; Youth employment; ALMP;

    JEL classification:

    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand
    • P27 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - Performance and Prospects

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