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Blame it on my youth! Policy recommendations for re-evaluating and reducing youth unemployment

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  • Kilhoffer, Zachary
  • Beblavý, Miroslav
  • Lenaerts, Karolien

Abstract

Youth unemployment has ranked high on the agenda of European policymakers since the onset of the crisis. Ten years later, youth unemployment remains stubbornly high in a number of member states. This paper offers policy recommendations for rethinking and reducing youth unemployment in Europe. To this end, it filters and summarises the results of the STYLE research project on youth unemployment in Europe, and supplements these with additional literature. The paper explores three sets of questions: i) How to define and measure youth employment? ii) What are its causes and effects? and iii) What can be done about the phenomenon? The findings indicate that youth unemployment is poorly understood and the most common measurements are insufficient. Its causes are diverse, arising from both the inherent disadvantages suffered by younger people in the labour market as well as from structural changes occurring in the labour market. The effects of youth unemployment are detrimental and significant at both the societal and individual level. Based on our analysis, we put forward 13 broad policy recommendations to address youth unemployment in Europe.

Suggested Citation

  • Kilhoffer, Zachary & Beblavý, Miroslav & Lenaerts, Karolien, 2018. "Blame it on my youth! Policy recommendations for re-evaluating and reducing youth unemployment," CEPS Papers 13342, Centre for European Policy Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:eps:cepswp:13342
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    File URL: https://www.ceps.eu/system/files/RR2018_01_BlameItOnMyYouth.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Bardasi, Elena & Francesconi, Marco, 2004. "The impact of atypical employment on individual wellbeing: evidence from a panel of British workers," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 58(9), pages 1671-1688, May.
    2. Berlingieri, Francesco & Bonin, Holger & Sprietsma, Maresa, 2014. "Youth unemployment in Europe: Appraisal and policy options," ZEW Expertises, ZEW - Leibniz Centre for European Economic Research, number 110578.
    3. John Martin, 2015. "Activation and active labour market policies in OECD countries: stylised facts and evidence on their effectiveness," IZA Journal of Labor Policy, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 4(1), pages 1-29, December.
    4. Daniel Sullivan & Till von Wachter, 2009. "Job Displacement and Mortality: An Analysis Using Administrative Data," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 124(3), pages 1265-1306.
    5. MARK WOODEN & ROGER WILKINS & SEAMUS McGUINNESS, 2007. "Minimum Wages And The ‘Working Poor’," Economic Papers, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 26(4), pages 295-307, December.
    6. Sue Maguire & Bart Cockx & Juan Dolado & Florentino Felgueroso & Marcel Jansen & Izabela Styczyńska & Elish Kelly & Seamus McGuinness & Werner Eichhorst & Holger Hinte & Ulf Rinne, 2013. "Youth unemployment," Intereconomics: Review of European Economic Policy, Springer;German National Library of Economics;Centre for European Policy Studies (CEPS), vol. 48(4), pages 196-235, July.
    7. Adriaan S. Kalwij, 2004. "Unemployment Experiences of Young Men: on the Road to Stable Employment?," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 66(2), pages 205-237, May.
    8. Niall O’Higgins, 2004. "Recent Trends in Youth Labour Markets and Youth Employment Policy in Europe and Central Asia," CELPE Discussion Papers 85, CELPE - Centre of Labour Economics and Economic Policy, University of Salerno, Italy.
    9. David N. F. Bell & David G. Blanchflower, 2011. "Young people and the Great Recession," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 27(2), pages 241-267.
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