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Bank Lending Shocks and the Euro Area Business Cycle

  • G. PEERSMAN

    ()

I estimate the impact of different types of bank lending shocks on the euro area economy. I first show that the dynamic effects depend on the type of shock. Whereas surges in lending caused by shocks at the supply side of the banking market have a significant positive impact on economic activity and inflation, exactly the opposite is the case for exogenous lending demand shocks. Second, the macroeconomic relevance of bank lending shocks is considerable. Overall, they account for more than half of output variation since the launch of the euro and up to 75 percent of long-run consumer prices variability. The majority of the fluctuations are caused by innovations to lending supply which are orthogonal to monetary policy. A more detailed inspection suggests that these innovations are mainly the result of shocks in the risk-taking appetite of banks triggered by shifts in long-term interest rates or the term spread. Specifically, when long-term government bond yields decline, banks reduce the volume of government loans and securities on their balance sheets whilst increasing the supply of loans to the private sector, which in turn boosts economic activity, inflation and short-run interest rates. Hence, in contrast to conventional wisdom, a falling term spread could predict rising economic activity, which has been the case for some periods within the sample.

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Paper provided by Ghent University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration in its series Working Papers of Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Ghent University, Belgium with number 11/766.

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Length: 30 pages
Date of creation: Dec 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:rug:rugwps:11/766
Contact details of provider: Postal: Hoveniersberg 4, B-9000 Gent
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Web page: http://www.ugent.be/eb

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  1. Domenico Giannone & Michèle Lenza & Lucrezia Reichlin, 2012. "Money, Credit, Monetary Policy and the Business Cycle in the Euro Area," Working Papers ECARES ECARES 2012-008, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
  2. Ben S. Bernanke & Alan S. Blinder, 1989. "The federal funds rate and the channels of monetary transmission," Working Papers 89-10, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
  3. Adrian, Tobias & Song Shin, Hyun, 2010. "Financial Intermediaries and Monetary Economics," Handbook of Monetary Economics, in: Benjamin M. Friedman & Michael Woodford (ed.), Handbook of Monetary Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 12, pages 601-650 Elsevier.
  4. Peersman, Gert, 2011. "Macroeconomic effects of unconventional monetary policy in the euro area," Working Paper Series 1397, European Central Bank.
  5. Uhlig, Harald, 1999. "What are the Effects of Monetary Policy on Output? Results from an Agnostic Identification Procedure," CEPR Discussion Papers 2137, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
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  7. Ben S. Bernanke & Alan S. Blinder, 1988. "Credit, Money, and Aggregate Demand," NBER Working Papers 2534, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Simon Gilchrist & Vladimir Yankov & Egon Zakrajsek, 2009. "Credit Market Shocks and Economic Fluctuations: Evidence from Corporate Bond and Stock Markets," NBER Working Papers 14863, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Estrella, Arturo & Hardouvelis, Gikas A, 1991. " The Term Structure as a Predictor of Real Economic Activity," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 46(2), pages 555-76, June.
  10. Ciccarelli, Matteo & Peydró, José-Luis & Maddaloni, Angela, 2010. "Trusting the bankers: a new look at the credit channel of monetary policy," Working Paper Series 1228, European Central Bank.
  11. Ioannidou, V. & Ongena, S. & Peydro, J.L., 2009. "Monetary Policy, Risk-Taking, and Pricing : Evidence from a Quasi-Natural Experiment," Discussion Paper 2009-31 S, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
  12. Peersman, Gert & Smets, Frank, 2001. "The monetary transmission mechanism in the euro area: more evidence from VAR analysis," Working Paper Series 0091, European Central Bank.
  13. Renee Fry & Adrian Pagan, 2007. "Some Issues in Using Sign Restrictions for Identifying Structural VARs," NCER Working Paper Series 14, National Centre for Econometric Research.
  14. Peersman, Gert, 2003. "What Caused the Early Millennium Slowdown? Evidence Based on Vector Autoregressions," CEPR Discussion Papers 4087, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  15. den Haan, Wouter J. & Sumner, Steven W. & Yamashiro, Guy M., 2007. "Bank loan portfolios and the monetary transmission mechanism," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(3), pages 904-924, April.
  16. Sims, Christopher A & Stock, James H & Watson, Mark W, 1990. "Inference in Linear Time Series Models with Some Unit Roots," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 58(1), pages 113-44, January.
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