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The impact of climate change on agriculture

Author

Listed:
  • John Quiggin

    (Department of Economics, University of Queensland)

Abstract

It is now virtually certain that Australia and the world will experience significant climate change over the next century, as a result of human-caused emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) and other greenhouse gases.

Suggested Citation

  • John Quiggin, 2008. "The impact of climate change on agriculture," Climate Change Working Papers WPC08_3, Risk and Sustainable Management Group, University of Queensland, revised Sep 2008.
  • Handle: RePEc:rsm:climte:c08_3
    as

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    File URL: http://www.uq.edu.au/rsmg/WP/WPC08_3.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Guoju, Xiao & Weixiang, Liu & Qiang, Xu & Zhaojun, Sun & Jing, Wang, 2005. "Effects of temperature increase and elevated CO2 concentration, with supplemental irrigation, on the yield of rain-fed spring wheat in a semiarid region of China," Agricultural Water Management, Elsevier, vol. 74(3), pages 243-255, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    climate change; agriculture;

    JEL classification:

    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming

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