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Migration Policy in the Conditions of Economic Turbulence: The Experience of the European Union and the Prospects of Russia

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  • Malakhov, Vladimir (Малахов, Владимир)

    (Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration (RANEPA))

  • Simon, Mark (Симон, Марк)

    (Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration (RANEPA))

Abstract

The research describes how the European Union's migration policy has been used as a means of economic growth, and how the strategy of migration processes’ regulation was changing, depending on economic conditions. Through the study of instruments used by the national governments and the EU institutions in the field of migration control during the crisis period, the authors identify both positive and negative aspects of their experience. The specifics of the Russian situation is considered in the context of the "new immigration countries" in Europe. The authors analyze the transformations of the Russian migration policy, assess the situation on the Russian labor market and identify the key internal and external challenges that Russia is the current period. Based on the research results, the recommendations on policy measures that can contribute to the sustainable economic development of our country are formulated

Suggested Citation

  • Malakhov, Vladimir (Малахов, Владимир) & Simon, Mark (Симон, Марк), 2017. "Migration Policy in the Conditions of Economic Turbulence: The Experience of the European Union and the Prospects of Russia," Working Papers 051723, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration.
  • Handle: RePEc:rnp:wpaper:051723
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    References listed on IDEAS

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