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Regional Prevalence of Health Worker Absenteeism in Tanzania

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  • FUJII, Tomoki

    (School of Economics, Singapore Management University)

Abstract

Absenteeism of health workers in developing countries is common and can severely undermine the reliability of health system. Therefore, it is important to understand where the prevalence of absenteeism is high. We develop a simple imputation method that combines a Service Delivery Indicators survey and a Service Provision Assessment survey to estimate the prevalence of absenteeism of health workers at the level of regions in Tanzania. The resulting estimates allow one to identify the regions in which the prevalence of absenteeism is significantly higher or lower than the national average and help policymakers determine the priority areas for intervention.

Suggested Citation

  • FUJII, Tomoki, 2018. "Regional Prevalence of Health Worker Absenteeism in Tanzania," Economics and Statistics Working Papers 14-2018, Singapore Management University, School of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ris:smuesw:2018_014
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Nazmul Chaudhury & Jeffrey Hammer & Michael Kremer & Karthik Muralidharan & F. Halsey Rogers, 2006. "Missing in Action: Teacher and Health Worker Absence in Developing Countries," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 20(1), pages 91-116, Winter.
    2. World Bank, 2012. "Service Delivery Indicators : Senegal," World Bank Publications - Reports 20125, The World Bank Group.
    3. Markus Goldstein & Joshua Graff Zivin & James Habyarimana & Cristian Pop-Eleches & Harsha Thirumurthy, 2013. "The Effect of Absenteeism and Clinic Protocol on Health Outcomes: The Case of Mother-to-Child Transmission of HIV in Kenya," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 5(2), pages 58-85, April.
    4. Fujii, Tomoki, 2008. "How Well Can We Target Aid with Rapidly Collected Data? Empirical Results for Poverty Mapping from Cambodia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 36(10), pages 1830-1842, October.
    5. World Bank, 2012. "Service Delivery Indicators : Tanzania," World Bank Publications - Reports 20126, The World Bank Group.
    6. Hiroyuki Yamada & Yasuyuki Sawada & Xubei Luo, 2013. "Why is Absenteeism Low among Public Health Workers in Lao PDR?," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(1), pages 125-133, January.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Sub-Saharan Africa; primary health facility; imputation; random-effects probit; service delivery indicator;
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