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Social Mobility in Bolivia is Finally Improving!

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  • Andersen, Lykke Eg

    (IISEC, Universidad Católica Boliviana)

Abstract

This paper evaluates the degree of social mobility in Bolivia, both by comparing to other Latin American countries, and by comparing social mobility at different points in time. While Bolivia had one of the lowest levels of social mobility in the region in 1997, the last 10 years have seen spectacular improvements, especially for rural and female teenagers. This is very good news, as it suggests that Bolivia has finally escaped the low mobility – low growth equilibrium where it has been stuck for so long.

Suggested Citation

  • Andersen, Lykke Eg, 2010. "Social Mobility in Bolivia is Finally Improving!," Documentos de trabajo 3/2010, Instituto de Investigaciones Socio-Económicas (IISEC), Universidad Católica Boliviana.
  • Handle: RePEc:ris:iisecd:2010_003
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Hassler, John & Mora , José V. Rodríguez, 1998. "IQ, Social Mobility and Growth," Seminar Papers 635, Stockholm University, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    2. Roland Bénabou & Jean Tirole, 2006. "Belief in a Just World and Redistributive Politics," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, pages 699-746.
    3. Alberto Alesina & George-Marios Angeletos, 2005. "Fairness and Redistribution," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 960-980.
    4. Viviane Azevedo & César P. Bouillon, 2009. "Social Mobility in Latin America: A Review of Existing Evidence," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 1656, Inter-American Development Bank.
    5. Mercado, Alejandro F. & Leitón Quiroga, Jorge G. M., 2009. "The Dynamics of Poverty in Bolivia," Documentos de trabajo 2/2009, Instituto de Investigaciones Socio-Económicas (IISEC), Universidad Católica Boliviana.
    6. Kevin M. Murphy & Andrei Shleifer & Robert W. Vishny, 1991. "The Allocation of Talent: Implications for Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 106(2), pages 503-530.
    7. Viviane Azevedo & Cesar Bouillon, 2009. "Social Mobility in Latin America: A Review of Existing Evidence," Research Department Publications 4634, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
    8. Baumol, William J., 1996. "Entrepreneurship: Productive, unproductive, and destructive," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, pages 3-22.
    9. Kremer, M., 1996. "How Much Does Sorting Increase Inequality?," Working papers 96-18, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
    10. Mercado, Alejandro F. & Leitón-Quiroga, Jorge G. M., 2009. "The Dynamics of Poverty in Bolivia," Revista Latinoamericana de Desarrollo Economico, Instituto de Investigaciones Socio-Económicas (IISEC), Universidad Católica Boliviana, issue 11, pages 45-81, Abril.
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    Cited by:

    1. Lykke E. Andersen & Augustus Griffin & Justus J. Krause & Gabriel Orduña Montekio, 2017. "Measuring Equality of Opportunity in Early Childhood: A methodological proposal using Demographic and Health Surveys," Development Research Working Paper Series 04/2017, Institute for Advanced Development Studies.
    2. Dorado, Silvia & Ventresca, Marc J., 2013. "Crescive entrepreneurship in complex social problems: Institutional conditions for entrepreneurial engagement," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 69-82.
    3. Joseph Deutsch & Jacques Silber, 2011. "An ordinal approach to the study of intergenerational opportunities for standard of living: the case of Latin America," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 9(4), pages 579-604, December.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Social Mobility; Bolivia;

    JEL classification:

    • E60 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - General
    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty
    • J12 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Marriage; Marital Dissolution; Family Structure
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth

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