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Social Mobility in Latin America: Links with Adolescent Schooling

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  • Lykke Andersen

Abstract

This paper proposes a new measure of social mobility. It is based on schooling gap regressions and uses the Fields decomposition to determine the importance of family background in explaining teenagers schooling gaps.

Suggested Citation

  • Lykke Andersen, 2001. "Social Mobility in Latin America: Links with Adolescent Schooling," Research Department Publications 3130, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
  • Handle: RePEc:idb:wpaper:3130
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    File URL: http://www.iadb.org/research/pub_hits.cfm?pub_id=R-433&pub_file_name=pubR-433.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Gaviria, Alejandro, 2002. "Intergenerational mobility, sibling inequality and borrowing constraints," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 21(4), pages 331-340, August.
    2. Hassler, John & Rodríguez Mora, José Vicente, 1998. "IQ, Social Mobility and Growth," CEPR Discussion Papers 1827, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Nancy Birdsall & Jere R. Behrman & Miguel Székely, 1998. "Intergenerational Schooling Mobility and Macro Conditions and Schooling Policies in Latin America," Research Department Publications 4144, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
    4. Kevin M. Murphy & Andrei Shleifer & Robert W. Vishny, 1991. "The Allocation of Talent: Implications for Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 106(2), pages 503-530.
    5. Momi Dahan & Alejandro Gaviria, 1999. "Sibling Correlations and Social Mobility in Latin America," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 1301, Inter-American Development Bank.
    6. Donald J. Robbins, 1999. "Gender, Human Capital and Growth: Evidence from Six Latin American Countries," OECD Development Centre Working Papers 151, OECD Publishing.
    7. Moulton, Brent R., 1986. "Random group effects and the precision of regression estimates," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 385-397, August.
    8. Joseph G. Altonji & Thomas A. Dunn, 1995. "The Effects of School and Family Characteristics on the Return to Education," NBER Working Papers 5072, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Kremer, M., 1996. "How Much Does Sorting Increase Inequality?," Working papers 96-18, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
    10. Behrman, Jere R & Taubman, Paul, 1986. "Birth Order, Schooling, and Earnings," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 4(3), pages 121-145, July.
    11. Dollar, David & Fisman, Raymond & Gatti, Roberta, 2001. "Are women really the "fairer" sex? Corruption and women in government," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 46(4), pages 423-429, December.
    12. Lakshmi K. Raut, 1996. "Signalling equilibrium, Intergenerational mobility and long-run growth," GE, Growth, Math methods 9603002, University Library of Munich, Germany.
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