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Business Cycle Synchronization in Asia: The Role of Financial and Trade Linkages

Author

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  • Dai, Yuwen

    () (Asia–Pacific Economic Cooperation)

Abstract

In this research project, we attempt to examine the behavior of business cycles in Asia in order to deepen our understanding of and expand research on this topic. Given the importance of the People’s Republic of China, Japan, and the United States in the region economy, we use these three economies as our “reference countries” to study the synchronization of their business cycles with other Asian economies of interest. In particular, we investigate the potential determinants underlying the synchronization of their business cycles, including trade linkages, financial linkages, and policy similarities. From our panel data analysis, we find empirical evidence of the impacts of trade channels, financial channels, and policy channels in determining the degree of their business cycle synchronization.

Suggested Citation

  • Dai, Yuwen, 2014. "Business Cycle Synchronization in Asia: The Role of Financial and Trade Linkages," Working Papers on Regional Economic Integration 139, Asian Development Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:ris:adbrei:0139
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    File URL: http://aric.adb.org/pdf/workingpaper/WP139_Dai_Business_Cycle_Synchronization.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jean Imbs, 2004. "Trade, Finance, Specialization, and Synchronization," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 86(3), pages 723-734, August.
    2. AkIn, Cigdem & Kose, M. Ayhan, 2008. "Changing nature of North-South linkages: Stylized facts and explanations," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(1), pages 1-28, February.
    3. Clark, Todd E. & van Wincoop, Eric, 2001. "Borders and business cycles," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(1), pages 59-85, October.
    4. Kose, M. Ayhan & Yi, Kei-Mu, 2006. "Can the standard international business cycle model explain the relation between trade and comovement?," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(2), pages 267-295, March.
    5. Baxter, Marianne & Kouparitsas, Michael A., 2005. "Determinants of business cycle comovement: a robust analysis," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(1), pages 113-157, January.
    6. Soyoung Kim & Sunghyun H. Kim, 2013. "International Capital Flows, Boom-Bust Cycles, And Business Cycle Synchronization In The Asia Pacific Region," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 31(1), pages 191-211, January.
    7. Dong He & Wei Liao, 2012. "Asian Business Cycle Synchronization," Pacific Economic Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 17(1), pages 106-135, February.
    8. Guillermo A. Calvo & Morris Goldstein & Eduard Hochreiter (ed.), 1996. "Private Capital Flows to Emerging Markets after the Mexican Crisis," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 49, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Hirata, Hideaki & Otsu, Keisuke, 2016. "Accounting for the economic relationship between Japan and the Asian Tigers," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 57-68.
    2. Etoundi Atenga, Eric Martial, 2017. "On the Determinants of output Co-movements in the CEMAC Zone:Examining the Role of Trade, Policy Channel, Economic Structure and Common Factors," MPRA Paper 82091, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    business cycle synchronization; macro interdependence; trade integration; financial integration; interest rate; fiscal balance; policy coordination; Asia; NIE-4; ASEAN-4; PRC; Japan; US; panel data analysis;

    JEL classification:

    • E30 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • F00 - International Economics - - General - - - General
    • F15 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Economic Integration
    • F36 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Financial Aspects of Economic Integration
    • F42 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - International Policy Coordination and Transmission
    • F44 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - International Business Cycles

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