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Conditional cash transfers, schoolingand child labor: micro-simulating bolsa escola

Author

Listed:
  • François Bourguignon

    (World Bank and DELTA)

  • Francisco H. G. Ferreira

    () (World Bank and Department of Economics PUC-Rio)

  • Phillippe Leite

    (World Bank and Department of Economics PUC-Rio)

Abstract

Cash transfers targeted to poor people, but conditional on some behavior on their part, such as school attendance or regular visits to health care facilities, are being adopted in a growing number of developing countries. Even where ex-post impact evaluations have been conducted, a number of policy-relevant counterfactual questions have remained unanswered. These are questions about the potential impact of changes in program design, such as benefit levels or the choice of the means-test, on both the current welfare and the behavioral response of household members. This paper proposes a method to simulate the effects of those alternative program designs on welfare and behavior, based on microeconometrically estimated models of household behavior. In an application to Brazil’s recently introduced federal Bolsa Escola program, we find a surprisingly strong effect of the conditionality on school attendance, but a muted impact of the transfers on the reduction of current poverty and inequality levels.

Suggested Citation

  • François Bourguignon & Francisco H. G. Ferreira & Phillippe Leite, 2003. "Conditional cash transfers, schoolingand child labor: micro-simulating bolsa escola," Textos para discussão 477, Department of Economics PUC-Rio (Brazil).
  • Handle: RePEc:rio:texdis:477
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    9. Ravallion, Martin & Wodon, Quentin, 2000. "Does Child Labour Displace Schooling? Evidence on Behavioural Responses to an Enrollment Subsidy," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 110(462), pages 158-175, March.
    10. Rosenzweig, Mark R & Evenson, Robert E, 1977. "Fertility, Schooling, and the Economic Contribution of Children in Rural India: An Econometric Analysis," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 45(5), pages 1065-1079, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. François Bourguignon & Amedeo Spadaro, 2006. "Microsimulation as a tool for evaluating redistribution policies," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 4(1), pages 77-106, April.
    2. Channarith Meng & Wade Pfau, 2012. "Simulating the Impacts of Cash Transfers on Poverty and School Attendance: The Case of Cambodia," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 33(4), pages 436-452, December.
    3. Barrientos, Armando, 2012. "Social Transfers and Growth: What Do We Know? What Do We Need to Find Out?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 11-20.
    4. Francisco Gonzalez & Irving Rosales, 2016. "The case against child labor bans," Working Papers 1601, University of Waterloo, Department of Economics, revised Jan 2016.
    5. N. Blunch & A. Dar & L. Guarcello & S. Lyon & A. Ritualo & F. Rosati, 2002. "Children's work in Zambia: a comparative study of survey instruments," UCW Working Paper 32, Understanding Children's Work (UCW Programme).
    6. Eliana Cardoso & Andre Portela Souza, 2004. "The Impact of Cash Transfers on Child Labor and School Attendance in Brazil," Vanderbilt University Department of Economics Working Papers 0407, Vanderbilt University Department of Economics.
    7. L. Guarcello & S. Lyon, 2003. "Children's work and water access in Yemen," UCW Working Paper 53, Understanding Children's Work (UCW Programme).
    8. Ryan, Mary & O’Donoghue, Cathal & Upton, Vincent, 2014. "Land Use Change From Agriculture To Forestry: A Structural Model Of The Income And Leisure Choices Of Farmers," 2014 International Congress, August 26-29, 2014, Ljubljana, Slovenia 182753, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    9. Alderman, Harold & Yemtsov, Ruslan, 2012. "Productive role of safety nets : background paper for the World Bank 2012-2022 social protection and labor strategy," Social Protection and Labor Policy and Technical Notes 67609, The World Bank.
    10. Nicola Brandt, 2012. "Reducing Poverty in Chile: Cash Transfers and Better Jobs," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 951, OECD Publishing.
    11. World Bank, 2013. "Republic of Madagascar : Mitigating the Impact of the Crisis on Education," World Bank Other Operational Studies 17012, The World Bank.
    12. Marco Sanfilippo & Bruno Martorano & Chris De Neubourg, 2012. "The Impact of Social Protection on Children: A review of the literature," Papers inwopa666, Innocenti Working Papers.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Conditional Transfers; Demand for Schooling; Child Labor JEL Codes: I38; J13; J22; J24;

    JEL classification:

    • I3 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty

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