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Environmental Goods Collection and Children’s Schooling: Evidence from Kenya

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  • Wagura Ndiritu, Simon
  • Nyangena, Wilfred

Abstract

This paper presents an empirical study of schooling attendance and collection of environmental resources using cross-sectional data from the Kiambu District of Kenya. Because the decision to collect environmental resources and attend school is jointly determined, we used a bivariate probit method to model the decisions. In addition, we corrected for the possible endogeneity of resource collection work in the school attendance equation by using instrumental variable probit estimation. One of the key findings is that being involved in resource collection reduces the likelihood of a child attending school. The result supports the hypothesis of a negative relationship between children working to collect resources and the likelihood that they will attend school. The results further show that a child’s mother’s involvement in resource collection increases school attendance. In addition, there is no school attendance discrimination against girls, but they are overburdened by resource collection work. The study recommends immediate policy interventions focusing on the provision of public amenities, such as water and fuelwood.

Suggested Citation

  • Wagura Ndiritu, Simon & Nyangena, Wilfred, 2010. "Environmental Goods Collection and Children’s Schooling: Evidence from Kenya," Discussion Papers dp-10-18-efd, Resources For the Future.
  • Handle: RePEc:rff:dpaper:dp-10-18-efd
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    File URL: http://www.rff.org/RFF/documents/EfD-DP-10-18.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Scheurlen, Elena, 2015. "Time allocation to energy resource collection in rural Ethiopia: Gender-disaggregated household responses to changes in firewood availability:," IFPRI discussion papers 1419, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    2. Kohlin, Gunnar & Sills, Erin O. & Pattanayak, Subhrendu K. & Wilfong, Christopher, 2011. "Energy, gender and development: what are the linkages ? where is the evidence ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5800, The World Bank.
    3. Bahre Gebru & Sosina Bezu, 2012. "Environmental Resource Collection versus Children’s Schooling: Evidence from Tigray, Northern Ethiopia," Working Papers 007, Ethiopian Development Research Institute.
    4. Undp, 2011. "HDR 2011 - Sustainability and Equity: A Better Future for All," Human Development Report (1990 to present), Human Development Report Office (HDRO), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), number hdr2011, December.
    5. Beyene, Abebe D. & Mekonnen, Alemu & Gebreegziabher, Zenebe, 2014. "Natural Resource Collection and Children’s Literacy: Empirical Evidence from Panel Data in Rural Ethiopia," Discussion Papers dp-14-18-efd, Resources For the Future.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    environmental goods collection; firewood; water; children; schooling; Kenya;

    JEL classification:

    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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