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Corporate Income Tax, Legal Form of Organization, and Employment

Author

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  • Don Schlagenhauf

    (Federal Reserve Bank of St Louis)

Abstract

A dynamic stochastic occupational choice model with heterogeneous agents is developed to evaluate the impact of a corporate income tax reduction on employment. In this framework, the key margin is the endogenous entrepreneurial choice of legal form of organization. A reduction in the corporate income tax burden encourages adoption of the C corporporation legal form, which reduces capital constraints on firms. Improved capital re-allocation increases overall productive efficiency in the economy and therefore expands the labor market. Relative to the benchmark economy, a corporate income tax cut can reduce the non-employment rate by up to 7 percent.

Suggested Citation

  • Don Schlagenhauf, 2018. "Corporate Income Tax, Legal Form of Organization, and Employment," 2018 Meeting Papers 334, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed018:334
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Erik Hurst & Benjamin Wild Pugsley, 2011. "What Do Small Businesses Do?," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 42(2 (Fall)), pages 73-142.
    2. Alan J. Auerbach, 2006. "Who Bears the Corporate Tax? A Review of What We Know," NBER Chapters, in: Tax Policy and the Economy, Volume 20, pages 1-40, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Michael P. Devereux & Li Liu & Simon Loretz, 2014. "The Elasticity of Corporate Taxable Income: New Evidence from UK Tax Records," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 6(2), pages 19-53, May.
    4. Goolsbee, Austan, 2004. "The impact of the corporate income tax: evidence from state organizational form data," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(11), pages 2283-2299, September.
    5. Laurence J. Kotlikoff & Jianjun Miao, 2013. "What Does the Corporate Income Tax Tax? A Simple Model Without Capital," Annals of Economics and Finance, Society for AEF, vol. 14(1), pages 1-19, May.
    6. Goolsbee, Austan, 1998. "Taxes, organizational form, and the deadweight loss of the corporate income tax," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(1), pages 143-152, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Lejour, Arjan & Massenz, Gabriella, 2020. "Income Shifting and Organizational Form Choice : Evidence from Europe," Discussion Paper 2020-013, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
    2. Antonio Estache & Beni Kouevi Gath, 2019. "Corporate Income Taxes and (Un-)Employment in the OECD," Working Papers ECARES 2019-11, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    3. Bing Xu & Lili Li & Yan Liang & Mohib Ur Rahman, 2019. "Measuring Risk Allocation of Tax Burden for Small and Micro Enterprises," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(3), pages 1-20, January.
    4. Sumudu Kankanamge & Alexandre Gaillard, 2019. "Entrepreneurship, Inter-Generational Business Transmission and Aging," 2019 Meeting Papers 1503, Society for Economic Dynamics.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • H25 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Business Taxes and Subsidies
    • H32 - Public Economics - - Fiscal Policies and Behavior of Economic Agents - - - Firm
    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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