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Renewable Technology Adoption and the Macroeconomy

Author

Listed:
  • Ted Temzelides

    (Rice University)

  • Borghan Narajabad

    (Federal Reserve)

  • Bernardino Adao

    (Banco de Portugal)

Abstract

We study the adaptation of new technologies by renewable energy-producing firms in a dynamic general equilibrium model where energy is an input in the production of goods. Energy can come from fossil or renewable sources. Both require the use of capital, which is also needed in the production of final goods. Renewable energy firms can invest in improving the productivity of their capital stock. The actual improvement is subject to spillovers and comes at the cost of some renewable energy output. Together with spill-overs, this leads to under-investment in improving the productivity of renewable energy capital. In the presence of environmental externalities, the optimal allocation can be implemented through a Pigouvian tax on fossil fuel, together with a policy which promotes adaptation of new renewable technologies. We study numerical examples using world-economy data.

Suggested Citation

  • Ted Temzelides & Borghan Narajabad & Bernardino Adao, 2016. "Renewable Technology Adoption and the Macroeconomy," 2016 Meeting Papers 6, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed016:6
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Daron Acemoglu & Ufuk Akcigit & Douglas Hanley & William Kerr, 2016. "Transition to Clean Technology," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 124(1), pages 52-104.
    2. Bornstein, Gideon & Krusell, Per & Rebelo, S�rgio, 2017. "Lags, Costs and Shocks: An Equilibrium Model of the Oil Industry," CEPR Discussion Papers 12047, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Gideon Bornstein & Per Krusell & Sergio Rebelo, 2017. "A World Equilibrium Model of the Oil Market," NBER Working Papers 23423, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D81 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Criteria for Decision-Making under Risk and Uncertainty
    • H21 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Efficiency; Optimal Taxation
    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming

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