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International Protection of Intellectual Property: A Quantitative Assessment

  • Jeff Thurk

    (University of Texas at Austin)

Registered author(s):

    IPR policies each period. I use country heterogeneity in education, population, and bilateral trade costs to induce IPR protection choices and firm productivity distributions consistent with the data. I compare the benchmark open economy model to a model without trade and find that the latter generates a similar rank-ordering of country IPR choices, but IPR choices decrease 2%, on average. I also show that imposing government commitment decreases IPR choices substantially. Finally, I ask who wins and who loses under a harmonized IPR standard? To answer this, I compare the benchmark model to a planner's solution where the planner chooses and commits to a single IPR policy for all countries. I find the planner's IPR policy is significantly lower than the benchmark US policy. Though average country welfare decreases, developed countries are largely better off.

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    Paper provided by Society for Economic Dynamics in its series 2010 Meeting Papers with number 479.

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    Date of creation: 2010
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:red:sed010:479
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    Society for Economic Dynamics Marina Azzimonti Department of Economics Stonybrook University 10 Nicolls Road Stonybrook NY 11790 USA

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    1. Elhanan Helpman & Marc Melitz & Yona Rubinstein, 2007. "Estimating Trade Flows: Trading Partners and Trading Volumes," NBER Working Papers 12927, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Keith E. Maskus, 2000. "Intellectual Property Rights in the Global Economy," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 99, January.
    3. Ulrich Doraszelski & Mark Satterthwaite, 2007. "Computable Markov-Perfect Industry Dynamics: Existence, Purification, and Multiplicity," Levine's Bibliography 321307000000000912, UCLA Department of Economics.
    4. Elhanan Helpman & Marc Melitz & Yona Rubinstein, 2008. "Estimating Trade Flows: Trading Partners and Trading Volumes," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 123(2), pages 441-487.
    5. Doraszelski, Ulrich & Satterthwaite, Mark, 2007. "Computable Markov-Perfect Industry Dynamics: Existence, Purification, and Multiplicity," CEPR Discussion Papers 6212, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    6. Phillip McCalman, 2005. "Who enjoys `TRIPs' abroad? An empirical analysis of intellectual property rights in the Uruguay Round," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 38(2), pages 574-603, May.
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