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Does growth discriminates against older workers?

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  • Moreno-Galbis Eva

    (University of Le Mans (GAINS TEPP))

  • LANGOT Francois

    (PSE Paris-Jourdan)

Abstract

This paper seeks to gain insights on the relationship between growth and employment, particularly when considering heterogeneous agents in terms of age. We introduce in the endogenous job destruction framework ` la Mortensen and Pissarides (1998) life cycle features. a We show that, under the assumption of homogeneous productivity among workers, firms tend to fire more often older workers rather than young ones, when deciding whether to update or not a technology: there is an equilibrium where the creative destruction effect dominates over the capitalization effect for old workers, whereas the capitalization effect dominates for the young workers. This discrimination against older workers can be moderated when we introduce heterogeneity (in terms of productivity) among workers. Indeed, it may be more interesting for the firm to pay the updating cost and train high-productivity old workers, in spite of their advanced age, rather than destroying their job and creating a new one. We also provide empirical support to these theoretical findings using OECD panel data set, and numerical simulations of the model.

Suggested Citation

  • Moreno-Galbis Eva & LANGOT Francois, 2008. "Does growth discriminates against older workers?," 2008 Meeting Papers 590, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed008:590
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Blanchard, Olivier & Wolfers, Justin, 2000. "The Role of Shocks and Institutions in the Rise of European Unemployment: The Aggregate Evidence," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 110(462), pages 1-33, March.
    2. Aubert Patrick & Caroli Eve & Roger Muriel, 2005. "New Technologies, Workplace Organisation and the Age Structure of the Workforce: Firm-Level Evidence," Research Unit Working Papers 0505, Laboratoire d'Economie Appliquee, INRA.
    3. E. Moreno-Galbis & Henri Sneessens, 2007. "Low-skilled unemployment, capital-skill complementarity and embodied technical progress," Recherches économiques de Louvain, De Boeck Université, vol. 73(3), pages 241-272.
    4. Dale T. Mortensen & Christopher A. Pissarides, 1998. "Technological Progress, Job Creation and Job Destruction," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 1(4), pages 733-753, October.
    5. Fabien Tripier, 2002. "The Dynamic Correlation Between Growth and Unemployment," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 5(4), pages 1-9.
    6. Eli Berman & John Bound & Zvi Griliches, 1994. "Changes in the Demand for Skilled Labor within U. S. Manufacturing: Evidence from the Annual Survey of Manufactures," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 109(2), pages 367-397.
    7. Hairault, Jean-Olivier & Langot, François & Sopraseuth, Thepthida, 2006. "The Interaction between Retirement and Job Search: A Global Approach to Older Workers Employment," IZA Discussion Papers 1984, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. Stephen Machin & John Van Reenen, 1998. "Technology and Changes in Skill Structure: Evidence from Seven OECD Countries," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 113(4), pages 1215-1244.
    9. Christopher A. Pissarides & Giovanna Vallanti, 2007. "The Impact Of Tfp Growth On Steady-State Unemployment," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 48(2), pages 607-640, May.
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