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Training and Age-Biased Technical Change

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  • Luc Behaghel
  • Nathalie Greenan

Abstract

Using a matched employer-employee dataset on the French manufacturing sector in the 1990s, we investigate how training incidence responds to technical and organizational changes. Using a difference-in-difference approach across age groups and types of firms, we find that older workers in low-skill occupations lag behind in terms of training (in computer skills and in teamwork) when firms implement advanced information technologies. By contrast, there is no significant difference between age groups in the training response to advanced IT among workers in high-skill occupations, or in the training response to new organizational practices (among all skill groups). These results suggest that a comparative disadvantage of older workers with regard to training in computer skills may be one cause of age-biased technical change. It severely affects low-skill older workers in firms implementing advanced information technologies. A partir de données appariées de salariés et d'entreprises industrielles en France dans les années 1990, on analyse comment l'accès à la formation continue évolue selon l'âge et en réponse aux changements technologiques et organisationnels

Suggested Citation

  • Luc Behaghel & Nathalie Greenan, 2010. "Training and Age-Biased Technical Change," Annals of Economics and Statistics, GENES, issue 99-100, pages 317-342.
  • Handle: RePEc:adr:anecst:y:2010:i:99-100:p:317-342
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    File URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41219169
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Meyer, Jenny, 2007. "Older Workers and the Adoption of New Technologies," ZEW Discussion Papers 07-050, ZEW - Leibniz Centre for European Economic Research.
    2. Moreno-Galbis Eva & LANGOT Francois, 2008. "Does growth discriminates against older workers?," 2008 Meeting Papers 590, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    3. Fries, Jan, 2014. "Age and skill bias of trade liberalisation? Heterogeneous employment effects of EU Eastern Enlargement," ZEW Discussion Papers 14-113, ZEW - Leibniz Centre for European Economic Research.
    4. Erling Barth & James C. Davis & Richard B. Freeman & Kristina McElheran, 2020. "Twisting the Demand Curve: Digitalization and the Older Workforce," NBER Working Papers 28094, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Nathalie Greenan & Mathieu Narcy & Serge Volkoff, 2012. "Ageing, changes, and quality of working life," Working Papers halshs-00856252, HAL.
    6. Nathalie Greenan & Pierre-Jean Messe, 2018. "Transmission of vocational skills in the second part of careers: the effect of ICT and management changes," Journal for Labour Market Research, Springer;Institute for Employment Research/ Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), vol. 52(1), pages 1-16, December.
    7. Pierre Cahuc, 2005. "Le difficile retour en emploi des seniors," Revue Française d'Économie, Programme National Persée, vol. 20(1), pages 3-56.
    8. Nathalie Greenan & Pierre-Jean Messe, 2014. "Transmission of vocational skills at the end of career: horizon effect and technological or organisational change," Working Papers halshs-01143496, HAL.
    9. Ferreira, Francisco H. G. & Firpo, Sergio & Messina, Julián, 2017. "Ageing Poorly? Accounting for the Decline in Earnings Inequality in Brazil, 1995-2012," IZA Discussion Papers 10656, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    10. Nathalie Greenan & Mathieu Narcy & Stéphane Robin, 2013. "Changements dans les entreprises et accès des seniors à la formation continue : une comparaison entre les années 1990 et 2000," Working Papers halshs-00965730, HAL.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J14 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of the Elderly; Economics of the Handicapped; Non-Labor Market Discrimination
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J26 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Retirement; Retirement Policies
    • O30 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - General

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