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The Institutional Sources of Innovation in Korean and UK Online Gaming Firms


  • Denise Tsang

    () (School of Management, University of Reading)


This paper examines the institutional sources of innovation, with reference to the role of institutions in generating creativity within knowledge-intensive entertainment industry. Despite growing importance of innovation in the knowledge industry, including interactive games, the ‘informal’ source of innovation has attracted relatively little attention. We have attempted to fill this gap with a comparative case study of indigenous UK and Korean online gaming firms. By closely looking at the idea exploration, generation and selection process where creativity plays a major role, we intend to find out why and how values and norms contribute to firm innovation. This study shows that both Korean and UK’s firm value, regardless of their different socio-economic contexts, plays an important role in generating innovation. An additional point suggested in this paper is that the Korean game development firms are likely to take advantage of governmental policy support, in order to overcome inadequate institutional settings, in conjunction with the initial conditions of online gaming development.

Suggested Citation

  • Denise Tsang, 2010. "The Institutional Sources of Innovation in Korean and UK Online Gaming Firms," Economics & Management Discussion Papers em-dp2009-08, Henley Business School, Reading University.
  • Handle: RePEc:rdg:emxxdp:em-dp2009-08

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    8. Hall, Peter A. & Soskice, David (ed.), 2001. "Varieties of Capitalism: The Institutional Foundations of Comparative Advantage," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199247752, June.
    9. Shane, Scott, 1993. "Cultural influences on national rates of innovation," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 8(1), pages 59-73, January.
    10. Laranja, Manuel & Uyarra, Elvira & Flanagan, Kieron, 2008. "Policies for science, technology and innovation: Translating rationales into regional policies in a multi-level setting," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(5), pages 823-835, June.
    11. Chris Freeman & Luc Soete, 1997. "The Economics of Industrial Innovation, 3rd Edition," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 3, volume 1, number 0262061953, July.
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    Online gaming industry; Institution; Innovation; Firm culture; Public policy;

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