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The location of business support programs: does the knowledge context matter?

In: Entrepreneurship, Social Capital and Governance

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  • Kingsley E. Haynes
  • Haifeng Qian
  • Sidney C. Turner

Abstract

This book highlights the role of entrepreneurship, social capital and governance for regional economic development. In recent decades, many researchers have claimed that entrepreneurship is the most critical factor in sustaining regional economic growth. However, most entrepreneurship research is undertaken without considering the fundamental importance of the regional context. Other research has emphasized the role of social capital but there are substantial problems in empirically relating measures of social capital to regional economic development.

Suggested Citation

  • Kingsley E. Haynes & Haifeng Qian & Sidney C. Turner, 2012. "The location of business support programs: does the knowledge context matter?," Chapters,in: Entrepreneurship, Social Capital and Governance, chapter 13, pages 302-324 Edward Elgar Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:elg:eechap:14810_13
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    2. Timothy J. Bartik, 2010. "Small Business Start-Ups in the United States: Estimates of the Effects of Characteristics of States," Book chapters authored by Upjohn Institute researchers,in: Zolton Acs (ed.), Entrepreneurship and regional Development, pages 155-169 W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
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    5. Haifeng Qian & Kingsley E. Haynes & James D. Riggle, 2011. "Incubation Push or Business Pull? Investigating the Geography of U.S. Business Incubators," Economic Development Quarterly, , vol. 25(1), pages 79-90, February.
    6. Acs, Zoltan J & Audretsch, David B, 1987. "Innovation, Market Structure, and Firm Size," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, pages 567-574.
    7. Jock Collins, 2003. "Cultural diversity and entrepreneurship: policy responses to immigrant entrepreneurs in Australia," Entrepreneurship & Regional Development, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(2), pages 137-149, January.
    8. David B. Audretsch, 1995. "Innovation and Industry Evolution," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262011468.
    9. Feldman, Maryann P, 2001. "The Entrepreneurial Event Revisited: Firm Formation in a Regional Context," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 10(4), pages 861-891, December.
    10. Audretsch, David B & Feldman, Maryann P, 1996. "R&D Spillovers and the Geography of Innovation and Production," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 630-640.
    11. Lerner, Josh, 1999. "The Government as Venture Capitalist: The Long-Run Impact of the SBIR Program," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 72(3), pages 285-318, July.
    12. John C. Haltiwanger & Ron S. Jarmin & Javier Miranda, 2010. "Who Creates Jobs? Small vs. Large vs. Young," NBER Working Papers 16300, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. Edward L. Glaeser, 1998. "Are Cities Dying?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, pages 139-160.
    14. Betsey Stevenson & Justin Wolfers, 2008. "Economic Growth and Subjective Well-Being: Reassessing the Easterlin Paradox," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, pages 1-102.
    15. McKinnish, Terra & White, T. Kirk, 2011. "Who moves to mixed-income neighborhoods?," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, pages 187-195.
    16. David Audretsch & Dirk Dohse & Annekatrin Niebuhr, 2010. "Cultural diversity and entrepreneurship: a regional analysis for Germany," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 45(1), pages 55-85, August.
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