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Street Pavement: Results from an Infrastructure Experiment in Mexico

Author

Listed:
  • Marco Gonzalez-Navarro

    (UC Berkeley)

  • Climent Quintana-Domeque

    (Universitat d'Alacant)

Abstract

Urban peripheries in many developing countries lack basic local public goods like street pavement, water, sewerage and electricity. We design an experiment of street pavement provision in a Mexican urban area and estimate impacts on a set of indicators obtained from a household survey. Our ndings show that houses in streets that were paved increased substantially in value, by 15% according to professional appraisals, and by 24% according to homeowners. Households living in streets that were paved obtained more credit, had higher per capita expenditures, increased motor vehicle ownership and were more likely to have made home improvements.

Suggested Citation

  • Marco Gonzalez-Navarro & Climent Quintana-Domeque, 2010. "Street Pavement: Results from an Infrastructure Experiment in Mexico," Working Papers 1247, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
  • Handle: RePEc:pri:indrel:556
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Joshua D. Angrist & Jörn-Steffen Pischke, 2009. "Mostly Harmless Econometrics: An Empiricist's Companion," Economics Books, Princeton University Press, edition 1, number 8769, October.
    2. Duflo, Esther & Glennerster, Rachel & Kremer, Michael, 2008. "Using Randomization in Development Economics Research: A Toolkit," Handbook of Development Economics, Elsevier.
    3. Shahidur R. Khandker & Zaid Bakht & Gayatri B. Koolwal, 2009. "The Poverty Impact of Rural Roads: Evidence from Bangladesh," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 57(4), pages 685-722, July.
    4. Frank Bean & Allan King & Jeffrey Passel, 1983. "The number of illegal migrants of Mexican origin in the United States: Sex ratio-based estimates for 1980," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 20(1), pages 99-109, February.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Adam Storeygard, 2016. "Farther on down the Road: Transport Costs, Trade and Urban Growth in Sub-Saharan Africa," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 83(3), pages 1263-1295.
    2. Naoyuki Yoshino & Umid Abidhadjaev, 2015. "An Impact Evaluation of Investment in Infrastructure : The Case of the Railway Connection in Uzbekistan," Working Papers id:7743, eSocialSciences.
    3. Yoshino, Naoyuki & Abidhadjaev, Umid, 2017. "An impact evaluation of investment in infrastructure: The case of a railway connection in Uzbekistan," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 1-11.
    4. Teresa Garcia-Milà & José Garcia Montalvo, 2013. "A new approach to measure the impact of highways on business location with an application to Spain," Economics Working Papers 1412, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
    5. Yoshino, Naoyuki & Abidhadjaev, Umid, 2016. "Impact of Infrastructure Investment on Tax: Estimating Spillover Effects of the Kyushu High-Speed Rail Line in Japan on Regional Tax Revenue," ADBI Working Papers 574, Asian Development Bank Institute.
    6. David Lewis & Ian Currie, 2016. "A New Role for Cost-Benefit Analysis in Canadian Transportation Infrastructure Investment," CSLS Research Reports 2016-02, Centre for the Study of Living Standards.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    public infrastructure improvements; Mexico; urban infrastructure; housing value; house prices;

    JEL classification:

    • C01 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - General - - - Econometrics
    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • H00 - Public Economics - - General - - - General
    • H54 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Infrastructures
    • R21 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Housing Demand

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