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Bank loan loss provisioning during election years: cross-country evidence

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  • Ozili, Peterson K

Abstract

I examine bank loan loss provisioning behaviour during election years - focusing on the effect of elections on banking sector loan loss provisioning. The findings reveal that the banking sectors in developed countries have higher loan loss provisions in election years. Income smoothing is present in election years which supports the income smoothing hypothesis. Also, banking sectors with high capital levels have higher loan loss provisions. Although there were no significant differences in bank loan loss provisioning during election years across the four bloc, the EU banking sectors and the banking sectors of BIS member-countries generally have higher loan loss provisions while the non-EU banking sectors and the banking sectors of the G7 member-countries generally have fewer loan loss provisions.

Suggested Citation

  • Ozili, Peterson K, 2020. "Bank loan loss provisioning during election years: cross-country evidence," MPRA Paper 96639, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:96639
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/96639/1/MPRA_paper_96639.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Cited by:

    1. Ozili, Peterson K, 2019. "Bank loan loss provisioning during election years in Nigeria," MPRA Paper 96704, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    loan loss provisions; income smoothing; election; banks; credit risk; nonperforming loans; institutional factors; corruption;

    JEL classification:

    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation
    • M4 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Accounting
    • M42 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Accounting - - - Auditing
    • M48 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Accounting - - - Government Policy and Regulation

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