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Learning Through Hiring: Knowledge From New Workers as an Explanation of Endogenous Growth

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  • Kirker, Michael

Abstract

This paper develops an endogenous growth model in which the job-to-job transition of workers provides a channel for the spillover of knowledge between firms. Workers learn some of the productive knowledge used by their employer while working on the job. When a worker moves to another firm, they are able to adapt some of this knowledge for use at the hiring firm. Firms endogenously control their exposure to new knowledge by choosing the intensity that they post vacancies in a search-and-matching labor market. It is shown that under a set of assumptions regarding the initial distribution of firm types and the vacancy posting cost function, the competitive equilibrium leads to a balanced growth path that has a constant growth rate and stationary distribution of firm size.

Suggested Citation

  • Kirker, Michael, 2019. "Learning Through Hiring: Knowledge From New Workers as an Explanation of Endogenous Growth," MPRA Paper 94505, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:94505
    as

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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/94505/1/MPRA_paper_94505.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Romer, Paul M, 1986. "Increasing Returns and Long-run Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 94(5), pages 1002-1037, October.
    2. Fosfuri, Andrea & Motta, Massimo & Ronde, Thomas, 2001. "Foreign direct investment and spillovers through workers' mobility," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(1), pages 205-222, February.
    3. Robert E. Lucas Jr. & Benjamin Moll, 2014. "Knowledge Growth and the Allocation of Time," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 122(1), pages 1-51.
    4. Lars A. Stole & Jeffrey Zwiebel, 1996. "Intra-firm Bargaining under Non-binding Contracts," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 63(3), pages 375-410.
    5. Glass, Amy Jocelyn & Saggi, Kamal, 2002. " Multinational Firms and Technology Transfer," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 104(4), pages 495-513, December.
    6. Jesse Perla & Christopher Tonetti, 2014. "Equilibrium Imitation and Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 122(1), pages 52-76.
    7. Michel Serafinelli, 2015. "Good Firms, Worker Flows and Local Productivity," Working Papers tecipa-538, University of Toronto, Department of Economics.
    8. Serafinelli, Michel, 2015. "Good Firms, Worker Flows and Local Productivity," Annual Conference 2015 (Muenster): Economic Development - Theory and Policy 113063, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    9. Andrey Stoyanov & Nikolay Zubanov, 2012. "Productivity Spillovers across Firms through Worker Mobility," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 4(2), pages 168-198, April.
    10. Pierpaolo Parrotta & Dario Pozzoli, 2012. "The effect of learning by hiring on productivity," RAND Journal of Economics, RAND Corporation, vol. 43(1), pages 167-185, March.
    11. Alexander Monge-Naranjo, 2012. "Foreign firms and the diffusion of knowledge," Working Papers 2012-055, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
    12. Lucas, Robert Jr., 1988. "On the mechanics of economic development," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 3-42, July.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Endogenous growth; productivity; labor mobility; search and matching market; knowledge diffusion;

    JEL classification:

    • J60 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - General
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes
    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General

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