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It's your turn: experiments with three-player public good games

Author

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  • Riyanto, Yohanes E.
  • Roy, Nilanjan

Abstract

We report results from experiments designed to investigate the prevalence of turn-taking in three-person finitely repeated threshold public good games without communication. Individuals can each make a discrete contribution. If the number of contributors is at least equal to the threshold, a public benefit accrues to all group members. Players take turns to provide the public good each round when the endowments are homogeneous. When the turn-taking path is at odds with efficiency or under private information of endowments, players seldom engage in taking turns. An endogenous-move protocol limits the frequency of mis-coordinated outcomes every round.

Suggested Citation

  • Riyanto, Yohanes E. & Roy, Nilanjan, 2017. "It's your turn: experiments with three-player public good games," MPRA Paper 76565, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:76565
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/76565/1/MPRA_paper_76565.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. repec:eee:joepsy:v:64:y:2018:i:c:p:49-56 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Public good provision; Turn-taking; Repeated game; Endogenous move; Experiment;

    JEL classification:

    • C72 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Noncooperative Games
    • C92 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Group Behavior
    • D03 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Behavioral Microeconomics: Underlying Principles
    • D82 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Asymmetric and Private Information; Mechanism Design
    • H41 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods - - - Public Goods

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