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Migration and the Tiebout-Tullock Hypothesis Revisited

  • Cebula, Richard

This empirical study investigates the Tiebout-Tullock hypothesis as it might have applied to net domestic state in-migration rates over the period 1990 through 1999. It appears that the net state in-migration rate has been directly related to the ratio of the total state plus local government outlays per capita on public education in a state to that state's total state plus local govern­ment tax burden per capita. Other variables included in the study, including the previous-period median single-family housing price inflation rate, a mea­sure of previous-period growth in real income per capita, and quality-of-life variables reflecting violent crime rates and sunnier climates, also seem to be significant determinants of the net state in-migration rate. Thus, for the study period, it appears that the Tiebout-Tullock hypothesis played a significant role in determining internal migration patterns.

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File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/52413/1/MPRA_paper_52413.pdf
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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 52413.

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Date of creation: 23 Jan 2001
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Publication status: Published in The Review of Regional Studies 1.32(2002): pp. 87-96
Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:52413
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  1. Paul S. Davies & Michael J. Greenwood & Haizheng Li, 2001. "A Conditional Logit Approach to U.S. State-to-State Migration," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 41(2), pages 337-360.
  2. Ira Saltz, 1998. "State income tax policy and geographic labour force mobility in the United States," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(10), pages 599-601.
  3. Tullock, Gordon, 1971. "Public Decisions as Public Goods," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 79(4), pages 913-18, July-Aug..
  4. Cebula, Richard J, 1990. "A Brief Empirical Note on the Tiebout Hypothesis and State Income Tax Policies," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 67(1), pages 87-89, October.
  5. Lowell E. Gallaway & Richard J. Cebula, 1973. "Differentials and Indeterminacy in Wage Rate Analysis: An Empirical Note," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 26(3), pages 991-995, April.
  6. White, Halbert, 1980. "A Heteroskedasticity-Consistent Covariance Matrix Estimator and a Direct Test for Heteroskedasticity," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 48(4), pages 817-38, May.
  7. Lewis R. Gale & Will Carrington Heath, 2000. "Elderly Internal Migration in the United States Revisited," Public Finance Review, SAGE Publishing, vol. 28(2), pages 153-170, March.
  8. Conway, Karen Smith & Houtenville, Andrew J, 1998. "Do the Elderly "Vote with Their Feet"?," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 97(4), pages 663-85, December.
  9. Dawn D. Thilmany & Travis J. Lybbert, 2000. "Migration effects of Olympic siting: A pooled time series cross-sectional analysis of host regions," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 34(3), pages 405-420.
  10. Richard J. Cebula, 2009. "Migration and the Tiebout-Tullock Hypothesis," American Journal of Economics and Sociology, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 68(2), pages 541-551, 04.
  11. Stephen M. Renas, 1980. "An Empirical Note on the Tiebout-Tullock Hypothesis: Comment," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 94(3), pages 619-623.
  12. Walter W. McMahon, 1991. "Geographical Cost of Living Differences: An Update," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 19(3), pages 426-450.
  13. Cebula, Richard, 1978. "The Determinants of Human Migration," MPRA Paper 58401, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  14. Greenwood, Michael J, 1975. "Research on Internal Migration in the United States: A Survey," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 13(2), pages 397-433, June.
  15. Cebula, Richard, 1973. "Interstate Migration and the Tiebout Hypothesis: An Analysis According to Race, Sex, and Age," MPRA Paper 49827, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 01 Feb 1974.
  16. Jim Millington, 2000. "Migration and Age: The Effect of Age on Sensitivity to Migration Stimuli," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(6), pages 521-533.
  17. Richard Cebula & Michael Toma, 2006. "Determinants of Geographic Differentials in the Voter Participation Rate," Atlantic Economic Journal, International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 34(1), pages 33-40, March.
  18. Richard J. Cebula, 1978. "An Empirical Note on the Tiebout-Tullock Hypothesis," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 92(4), pages 705-711.
  19. Charles M. Tiebout, 1956. "A Pure Theory of Local Expenditures," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 64, pages 416.
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