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Factors Influencing the State-Level Settlement Pattern of the Undocumented Immigrant Population in the United States

  • Cebula, Richard
  • Duquette, Christopher
  • Mixon, Franklin

This study empirically attempts to identify key factors determining the settlement patterns of undocumented immigrants within the United States. The estimations imply that undocumented immigrants appear to settle in states that border the Atlantic Ocean, Pacific Ocean, or the Gulf of Mexico, and states where median family income is higher, average January temperatures are higher, the percent of the state population that is Hispanic is higher, and where economic freedom is higher. On the other hand, undocumented immigrants are less likely to settle in states with a higher cost of living.

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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 49442.

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Date of creation: 02 Feb 2013
Date of revision: 01 Apr 2013
Publication status: Published in Atlantic Economic Journal 3.41(2013): pp. 3-13
Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:49442
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  1. Cebula, Richard & Kohn, Robert & Vedder, Richard, 1972. "Some Determinants of Interstate Migration of Blacks, 1965-1970," MPRA Paper 50065, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  2. Gordon H. Hanson, 2006. "Illegal Migration from Mexico to the United States," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 44(4), pages 869-924, December.
  3. Fairlie, Robert, 2014. "Does Immigration Induce "Native Flight" from Public Schools into Private Schools?," Santa Cruz Department of Economics, Working Paper Series qt85s5v99k, Department of Economics, UC Santa Cruz.
  4. White, Halbert, 1980. "A Heteroskedasticity-Consistent Covariance Matrix Estimator and a Direct Test for Heteroskedasticity," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 48(4), pages 817-38, May.
  5. Christer Gerdes, 2013. "Does immigration induce “native flight” from public schools?," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer, vol. 50(2), pages 645-666, April.
  6. Cebula, Richard, 1978. "The Determinants of Human Migration," MPRA Paper 58401, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  7. George J. Borjas, 1998. "Immigration and Welfare Magnets," NBER Working Papers 6813, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Lewis R. Gale & Will Carrington Heath, 2000. "Elderly Internal Migration in the United States Revisited," Public Finance Review, , vol. 28(2), pages 153-170, March.
  9. Cebula, Richard J. & Alexander, Gigi M., 2006. "Determinants of Net Interstate Migration, 2000-2004," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 36(2).
  10. Mark Gradstein & Moshe Justman, 2002. "Education, Social Cohesion, and Economic Growth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(4), pages 1192-1204, September.
  11. Gradstein, Mark & Justman, Moshe, 2000. "Human capital, social capital, and public schooling," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 44(4-6), pages 879-890, May.
  12. Karen Smith Conway & Andrew J. Houtenville, 2003. "Out with the Old, In with the Old: A Closer Look at Younger Versus Older Elderly Migration," Social Science Quarterly, Southwestern Social Science Association, vol. 84(2), pages 309-328.
  13. Conway, Karen Smith & Houtenville, Andrew J, 1998. " Do the Elderly "Vote with Their Feet"?," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 97(4), pages 663-85, December.
  14. Conway, Karen Smith & Houtenville, Andrew J., 2001. "Elderly Migration and State Fiscal Policy: Evidence from the 1990 Census Migration Flows," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 54(n. 1), pages 103-24, March.
  15. Richard J. Cebula & J.R. Clark, 2011. "Migration, Economic Freedom, and Personal Freedom: An Empirical Analysis," Journal of Private Enterprise, The Association of Private Enterprise Education, vol. 27(Fall 2011), pages 43-62.
  16. Astghik Mavisakalyan, 2011. "Immigration, Public Education Spending, and Private Schooling," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 78(2), pages 397-423, October.
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