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The Role of Advertising Expenditure in Measuring Indonesia’s Money Demand Function

  • Hiew, Lee-Chea
  • Puah, Chin-Hong
  • Habibullah, Muzafar Shah

Using the consumer theory approach as suggested by Habibullah (2009), this study aims to shed new light on monetary authority by incorporating advertising expenditure, a variable that has been neglected in the past, into study of the money demand function in Indonesia. In addition, different measurements of monetary aggregates (simple-sum and Divisia money) have been used in the estimation to provide better insight into the selection of a suitable monetary policy variable for the case of Indonesia. Empirical findings from the error-correction model (ECM) indicate that the advertising expenditure variable has a significant impact on the demand for money. Furthermore, as compared to simple-sum money, the model that used Divisia monetary aggregates rendered more plausible estimation results in the estimation of money demand function.

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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 50223.

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Date of creation: 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:50223
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  1. Arminio Fraga & Ilan Goldfajn & André Minella, 2004. "Inflation Targeting in Emerging Market Economies," NBER Chapters, in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 2003, Volume 18, pages 365-416 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. James Hueng, C., 1998. "The demand for money in an open economy: Some evidence for Canada," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 9(1), pages 15-31.
  3. Mingxia Zhang & Richard J. Sexton, 2002. "Optimal Commodity Promotion when Downstream Markets are Imperfectly Competitive," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 84(2), pages 352-365.
  4. Johansen, Soren & Juselius, Katarina, 1990. "Maximum Likelihood Estimation and Inference on Cointegration--With Applications to the Demand for Money," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 52(2), pages 169-210, May.
  5. Chin-Hong, Puah & Muzafar Shah, Habibullah & Venus Khim-Sen, Liew, 2009. "Is Money Neutral In Stock Market? The Case of Malaysia," MPRA Paper 24017, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 2010.
  6. Barnett, William A., 1980. "Economic monetary aggregates an application of index number and aggregation theory," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 14(1), pages 11-48, September.
  7. Muzafar Shah Habibullah, 1998. "Divisia money and income in Indonesia: some results from error-correction models, 1981:1-1994:4," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(6), pages 387-391.
  8. Daniel Daianu & Laurian Lungu, 2005. "Inflation Targeting, Between Rhetoric and Reality. The Case of Transition Economies," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series wp743, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
  9. Leong, Choi-Meng & Puah, Chin-Hong & Abu Mansor, Shazali & Evan, Lau, 2008. "Testing the Effectiveness of Monetary Policy in Malaysia Using Alternative Monetary Aggregation," MPRA Paper 10568, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  10. Guy Debelle & Miguel A. Savastano & Paul R. Masson & Sunil Sharma, 1998. "Inflation Targeting as a Framework for Monetary Policy," IMF Economic Issues 15, International Monetary Fund.
  11. Barnett, William A & Offenbacher, Edward K & Spindt, Paul A, 1984. "The New Divisia Monetary Aggregates," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 92(6), pages 1049-85, December.
  12. Chin-Hong, Puah & Lee-Chea, Hiew, 2010. "Financial Liberalization, Weighted Monetary Aggregates and Money Demand in Indonesia," MPRA Paper 31731, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  13. Leigh Drake & Terence C. Mills, 2005. "A New Empirically Weighted Monetary Aggregate for the United States," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 43(1), pages 138-157, January.
  14. Darrat, Ali F. & Chopin, Marc C. & Lobo, Bento J., 2005. "Money and macroeconomic performance: revisiting divisia money," Review of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(2), pages 93-101.
  15. Taylor, Lester D & Weiserbs, Daniel, 1972. "Advertising and the Aggregate Consumption Function," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 62(4), pages 642-55, September.
  16. Saving, Thomas R, 1971. "Transactions Costs and the Demand for Money," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 61(3), pages 407-20, June.
  17. Barnett, William A., 1978. "The user cost of money," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 1(2), pages 145-149.
  18. Yu, Qiao & Tsui, Albert K., 2000. "Monetary services and money demand in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 11(2), pages 134-148, December.
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