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Transmission Intergénérationelle de l’Entrepreneuriat et Performance des Unités de Production Informelles au Cameroun

Author

Listed:
  • Mboutchouang, Vincent De Paul
  • Kenneck, Joseph Massil
  • Mbenga Bindop, Kunz Modeste

Abstract

This study aims to contribute to the debate on the determinants of the informal firms’ outcomes by focusing on the potential influence that the family background can have on informal business outcomes in Cameroon. Using data from the Survey on Employment and the Informal Sector (SESI 2) in Cameroun, this study shows that children of self-employed father and/or mother have a better value added, sales in some cases, than entrepreneur that parents does not have this status. This comparative advantage is strengthened when the transmission is between a father and his son or when the child, regardless of gender, is engaged in the same branch of activity as his parent(s). This transmission consists of the dissemination of a stock of human capital in the form of specific skills. Résumé Cette étude vise à contribuer au débat sur les résultats des entreprises du secteur informel en se focalisant sur l’éventuel influence que peut avoir l’environnement familial sur la performance d’une firme. A partir, des données de l’Enquête sur l’Emploi et le Secteur Informel au Cameroun (EESI 2), l’étude montre que les individus ayant eu un père et/ou une mère entrepreneurs réalisent une valeur ajoutée et des ventes, plus importantes que les entrepreneurs descendants de parents n’ayant pas ce statut. Cet avantage comparatif se renforce lorsque la transmission s’établit entre le père et son fils ou lorsque l’enfant, indépendamment du genre, s’engage à son compte propre dans la même branche d’activité que son père et/ou sa mère. Cette transmission consiste principalement à une diffusion d’un stock de capital humain sous forme de compétences spécifiques.

Suggested Citation

  • Mboutchouang, Vincent De Paul & Kenneck, Joseph Massil & Mbenga Bindop, Kunz Modeste, 2013. "Transmission Intergénérationelle de l’Entrepreneuriat et Performance des Unités de Production Informelles au Cameroun," MPRA Paper 50133, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Aug 2013.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:50133
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/50133/2/MPRA_paper_50133.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Björn Nilsson, 2017. "The School-to-work transition in developing countries," Working Papers DT/2017/07, DIAL (Développement, Institutions et Mondialisation).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Intergenerational transmission; second-generation entrepreneur; informal firm; business outcomes;

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • L26 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Entrepreneurship

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