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Seniority, Information and Electoral Accountability

Listed author(s):
  • Rodet, Cortney Stephen

This paper addresses the impact information has on electoral accountability in a legislative system based on seniority using laboratory experiments. A purely rational choice perspective of a simple voting environment implies that information is inconsequential when seniority is exceptionally valuable. Seniority advantage presents the opportunity to shirk at the expense of voters. I contrast the rational choice perspective to behavioral considerations of trust, betrayal and expectations. Voter information about incumbent behavior is varied across experimental treatments, and I find that information leads to accountability when voters can compare their own incumbent’s behavior to the behavior of others. Moreover, information deters incumbent shirking.

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File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/49863/1/MPRA_paper_49863.pdf
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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 49863.

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Date of creation: Aug 2013
Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:49863
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  13. Ferraz, Claudio & Finan, Frederico S., 2007. "Exposing Corrupt Politicians: The Effects of Brazil’s Publicly Released Audits on Electoral Outcomes," IZA Discussion Papers 2836, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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