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Real estate prices in Japan and Lewis turning point


  • Tabata, Katsushi
  • Kawaguchi, Yuichiro


This paper has done a model analysis from a long-term perspective about Real estate prices in Japan. In particular, we consider a Lewis turning point with the rise of land prices over time. It is analyzed by state space methods. Using the model, we examined how the real estate transactions were affected by the population growth and the technological progress. Furthermore, we have compared two types of models which consider banking sector and no banking transactions. In particular, population decline in Japan would have a significant impact to the long term recession since 1990. We are skeptical about the population declining effect using our model. A Summary of our model estimation is as follows. (1) The Lewis turning point with both technological progress and population growth is confirmed. Japan has passed the Lewis turning point in the second half of '70. (2) Since then, banks played an important role in the formation of real estate prices. (3) A trend that has lowered the price of real estate with declining population cannot be confirmed clearly. (4) In the bubble period, real estate price exceeds the reality of the macro economy due to the bank loan behavior. The Japanese experience of the rise in land prices is very interesting in considering the future of the Asian countries. Asian countries have made remarkable economic development. However, these benefits of growth would be absorbed by the increase in asset prices and real estate investment. This is very similar to the past experience of Japan.

Suggested Citation

  • Tabata, Katsushi & Kawaguchi, Yuichiro, 2013. "Real estate prices in Japan and Lewis turning point," MPRA Paper 49090, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:49090

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Romer, Paul M, 1986. "Increasing Returns and Long-run Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 94(5), pages 1002-1037, October.
    2. Gary D. Hansen & Edward C. Prescott, 2002. "Malthus to Solow," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(4), pages 1205-1217, September.
    3. Kollmann, Robert & Enders, Zeno & Müller, Gernot J., 2011. "Global banking and international business cycles," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 55(3), pages 407-426, April.
    4. David N. Weil & Oded Galor, 2000. "Population, Technology, and Growth: From Malthusian Stagnation to the Demographic Transition and Beyond," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(4), pages 806-828, September.
    5. In't Veld, Jan & Raciborski, Rafal & Ratto, Marco & Roeger, Werner, 2011. "The recent boom-bust cycle: The relative contribution of capital flows, credit supply and asset bubbles," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 55(3), pages 386-406, April.
    6. Betts, Caroline & Devereux, Michael B., 2000. "Exchange rate dynamics in a model of pricing-to-market," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(1), pages 215-244, February.
    7. Frank Smets & Raf Wouters, 2003. "An Estimated Dynamic Stochastic General Equilibrium Model of the Euro Area," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 1(5), pages 1123-1175, September.
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    More about this item


    Real Estate; Financial Accelerator; Population; Lewis Turning Point;

    JEL classification:

    • E37 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Forecasting and Simulation: Models and Applications
    • J11 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Demographic Trends, Macroeconomic Effects, and Forecasts
    • O10 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - General

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