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The long-run Relationship between Human Capital and Economic Growth in Sweden

  • Awel, Ahmed Mohammed

The relationship between education and economic growth has been one of the fundamental themes of economic analysis. Despite the growing interest in the relationship between growth and education, and despite the strong theoretical foundations for a key role of education/human capital in economic growth, the empirical evidences, particularly those using causality analyses, are fragile at best. By utilizing the recently developed series of human capital, this paper examined the causal relationship between human capital and economic growth for Sweden over the period 1870-2000. The result from the Granger causality test shows that there is bidirectional causality running from human capital to output per worker and vice versa. Moreover, using vector error correction model, the paper shows that human capital has a significant positive impact on economic growth in Sweden.

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File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/45183/1/MPRA_paper_45183.pdf
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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 45183.

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Date of creation: Mar 2013
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:45183
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  1. Asteriou, D. & Agiomirgianakis, G. M., 2001. "Human capital and economic growth: Time series evidence from Greece," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 23(5), pages 481-489, July.
  2. Robert J. Barro, 1995. "Inflation and Economic Growth," NBER Working Papers 5326, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Brian Francis & Sunday Iyare, 2006. "Education and development in the caribbean: a cointegration and causality approach," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 15(2), pages 1-13.
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  5. Rebelo, Sergio, 1991. "Long-Run Policy Analysis and Long-Run Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(3), pages 500-521, June.
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  7. Robert J. Barro & Jong-Wha Lee, 1993. "International Comparisons of Educational Attainment," NBER Working Papers 4349, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Lucas, Robert Jr., 1988. "On the mechanics of economic development," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 3-42, July.
  9. Benhabib, Jess & Spiegel, Mark M., 1994. "The role of human capital in economic development evidence from aggregate cross-country data," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(2), pages 143-173, October.
  10. Jonas Ljungberg & Anders Nilsson, 2009. "Human capital and economic growth: Sweden 1870–2000," Cliometrica, Journal of Historical Economics and Econometric History, Association Française de Cliométrie (AFC), vol. 3(1), pages 71-95, January.
  11. Peter J. Klenow & Mark Bils, 2000. "Does Schooling Cause Growth?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(5), pages 1160-1183, December.
  12. Howitt, Peter & Aghion, Philippe, 1998. "Capital Accumulation and Innovation as Complementary Factors in Long-Run Growth," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 3(2), pages 111-30, June.
  13. repec:ebl:ecbull:v:15:y:2006:i:2:p:1-13 is not listed on IDEAS
  14. N. Gregory Mankiw & David Romer & David N. Weil, 1990. "A Contribution to the Empirics of Economic Growth," NBER Working Papers 3541, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  15. Romer, Paul M, 1990. "Are Nonconvexities Important for Understanding Growth?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 80(2), pages 97-103, May.
  16. Abhijeet, Chandra, 2010. "Does Government Expenditure on Education Promote Economic Growth? An Econometric Analysis," MPRA Paper 25480, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  17. Svitlana Maksymenko & Mahbub Rabbani, 2011. "Economic Reforms, Human Capital, And Economic Growth In India And South Korea: A Cointegration Analysis," Journal of Economic Development, Chung-Ang Unviersity, Department of Economics, vol. 36(2), pages 39-59, June.
  18. Granger, C W J, 1969. "Investigating Causal Relations by Econometric Models and Cross-Spectral Methods," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 37(3), pages 424-38, July.
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