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Friends and health of the workers in Italy

  • Fiorillo, Damiano

Using a rich cross-sectional dataset, we estimate the effect of meetings with friends on self-perceived health, chronic conditions and limitations in daily activities of Italian employees. We address the self-selection of individuals in labour market using an Heckman selection model. Our main preliminary findings show that meetings with friends is positively correlated with self-perceived health, negatively associated with chronic conditions but not related to limitations in activities of daily living.

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File URL: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/44270/1/MPRA_paper_44270.pdf
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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 44270.

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Date of creation: 07 Feb 2013
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:44270
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  1. Fiorillo, D; & Nappo, N;, 2011. "Job satisfaction in Italy: Individual characteristics and social relations," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 11/09, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
  2. Eddy van Doorslaer & Xander Koolman & Andrew M. Jones, 2004. "Explaining income-related inequalities in doctor utilisation in Europe," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(7), pages 629-647.
  3. De Silva, Mary J. & Huttly, Sharon R. & Harpham, Trudy & Kenward, Michael G., 2007. "Social capital and mental health: A comparative analysis of four low income countries," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 64(1), pages 5-20, January.
  4. Cristina Hernández-Quevedo & Andrew M. Jones & Nigel Rice, 2007. "Persistence in health limitations: a European comparative analysis," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 07/03, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
  5. Eiji Yamamura, 2010. "Different effects of social capital on health status among residents: evidence from modern Japan," EERI Research Paper Series EERI_RP_2010_29, Economics and Econometrics Research Institute (EERI), Brussels.
  6. Justina A. V. Fischer & Alfonso Sousa-Poza, 2009. "Does job satisfaction improve the health of workers? New evidence using panel data and objective measures of health," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(1), pages 71-89.
  7. Fiorillo, Damiano & Sabatini, Fabio, 2010. "An exploratory analysis of the relationship between social interactions, income and health in Italy," MPRA Paper 26728, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  8. Folland, Sherman, 2007. "Does "community social capital" contribute to population health?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 64(11), pages 2342-2354, June.
  9. Ferlander, Sara & Mäkinen, Ilkka Henrik, 2009. "Social capital, gender and self-rated health. Evidence from the Moscow Health Survey 2004," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 69(9), pages 1323-1332, November.
  10. Lucas Ronconi & Timothy T. Brown & Richard M. Scheffler, 2012. "Social capital and self‐rated health in Argentina," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 21(2), pages 201-208, 02.
  11. Fiorillo, Damiano & Sabatini, Fabio, 2011. "Quality and quantity: The role of social interactions in self-reported individual health," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 73(11), pages 1644-1652.
  12. Vincenzo Atella & Francesco Brindisi & Partha Deb & Furio C. Rosati, 2003. "Determinants of Access to Physician Services in Italy: A Latent Class Seemingly Unrelated Probit Approach," CEIS Research Paper 36, Tor Vergata University, CEIS.
  13. Jason M. Fletcher & Jody L. Sindelar & Shintaro Yamaguchi, 2009. "Cumulative Effects of Job Characteristics on Health," NBER Working Papers 15121, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  14. Tin Su & Subhash Pokhrel & Adjima Gbangou & Steffen Flessa, 2006. "Determinants of household health expenditure on western institutional health care," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer, vol. 7(3), pages 195-203, September.
  15. Nabanita Datta Gupta & Nicolai Kristensen, 2008. "Work environment satisfaction and employee health: panel evidence from Denmark, France and Spain, 1994–2001," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer, vol. 9(1), pages 51-61, February.
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