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Work, Rest, and Play: Exploring Trends in Time Allocation in Canada and the United States

Author

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  • McFarlane, Adian
  • Tedds, Lindsay

Abstract

We control for demographic changes to document trends in the allocation of time using time diary data for Canada (1986 to 2005) and the United States (1985 to 2005). We find that (1) in 2005, average weekly hours spent on market work is higher in Canada than in the U.S. (37.29 vs. 33.29) , (2) between 1986 and 2005 market work increased by an average of 3.75 hours per week in Canada, but in the U.S it remained relatively stable, and (3) over the sample period, leisure time increased in the U.S., but fell in Canada. In addition, the least educated enjoy more leisure relative to the most highly educated in both countries but this inequality is narrowing for Canadian men.

Suggested Citation

  • McFarlane, Adian & Tedds, Lindsay, 2007. "Work, Rest, and Play: Exploring Trends in Time Allocation in Canada and the United States," MPRA Paper 4211, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:4211
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/4211/1/MPRA_paper_4211.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Mark Aguiar & Erik Hurst, 2007. "Measuring Trends in Leisure: The Allocation of Time Over Five Decades," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 122(3), pages 969-1006.
    2. Fuess, Jr., Scott M., 2006. "Leisure Time in Japan: How Much and for Whom?," IZA Discussion Papers 2002, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Market Work; Home Production; Leisure; Time Use;

    JEL classification:

    • O57 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Comparative Studies of Countries
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • D13 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Production and Intrahouse Allocation

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    1. Papers and articles using the American Time Use Survey (ATUS)

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