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The economics of food security in Arab micro states: preliminary evidence from micro data

Author

Listed:
  • Basher, Syed Abul
  • Raboy, David G.
  • Kaitibie, Simeon
  • Hossain, Ishrat

Abstract

Using Qatar as a case study, we exploit a novel micro dataset for 102 raw agricultural imported commodities on a shipment-by-shipment basis over the period January 1, 2005 to June 30, 2010. The data comprise over half a million individual observations, with a very rich set of characteristic specifications. Several interesting initial results emerge from the analysis. First, we find evidence of import-price volatility far in excess of world price volatility across a wide spectrum of commodities. Second, supply origins for virtually all commodities are highly concentrated. In many cases commodities are sole sourced. Third, although less so, concentration is evidenced among Qatari importing companies for certain commodities. Fourth, we notice anomalies that lead to inefficient shipping methodologies and associated increased costs. The paper concludes by providing guidance for future empirical research.

Suggested Citation

  • Basher, Syed Abul & Raboy, David G. & Kaitibie, Simeon & Hossain, Ishrat, 2012. "The economics of food security in Arab micro states: preliminary evidence from micro data," MPRA Paper 39357, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:39357
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/46491/8/MPRA_paper_46491.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Wiggins, Steven N & Raboy, David G, 1996. "Price Premia to Name Brands: An Empirical Analysis," Journal of Industrial Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 44(4), pages 377-388, December.
    2. Easterly, William & Kraay, Aart, 2000. "Small States, Small Problems? Income, Growth, and Volatility in Small States," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 28(11), pages 2013-2027, November.
    3. Elena I. Ianchovichina & Josef L. Loening & Christina A. Wood, 2014. "How Vulnerable are Arab Countries to Global Food Price Shocks?," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 50(9), pages 1302-1319, September.
    4. Timothy J. Richards & Pieter. Van Ispelen & Albert Kagan, 1997. "A Two-Stage Analysis of the Effectiveness of Promotion Programs for U.S. Apples," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 79(3), pages 825-837.
    5. Armstrong, Harvey & Read, Robert, 1995. "Western European micro-states and EU autonomous regions: The advantages of size and sovereignty," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 23(7), pages 1229-1245, July.
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    7. Streeten, Paul, 1993. "The special problems of small countries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 21(2), pages 197-202, February.
    8. Rosen, Sherwin, 1974. "Hedonic Prices and Implicit Markets: Product Differentiation in Pure Competition," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 82(1), pages 34-55, Jan.-Feb..
    9. Yang, Seung-Ryong & Koo, Won W., 1994. "Japanese Meat Import Demand Estimation With The Source Differentiated Aids Model," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 19(02), December.
    10. Loening, Josef L., 2011. "Middle East and North Africa Countries' Vulnerability to Commodity Price Increases," MPRA Paper 33393, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Food security; Import data; Market concentration; Price volatility; Logistic inefficiency;

    JEL classification:

    • Q17 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agriculture in International Trade
    • L10 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - General
    • Q18 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agricultural Policy; Food Policy

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