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Does employment protection lead to unemployment? A panel data analysis of OECD countries, 1990-2008

  • Sarkar, Prabirjit

This paper analysed the OECD data on employment protection for 23 OECD countries over the time span 1990-2008 on the basis of alternative dynamic panel data models and panel causality tests and examines the validity of the neo-liberal argument that strictness of employment protection hurts labour through increased long-term and youth unemployment rates. While it finds no empirical basis for this orthodox standpoint it observes that long-term unemployment dampens aggregate production which in turn aggravates unemployment problem.

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File URL: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/35547/1/MPRA_paper_35547.pdf
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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 35547.

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Date of creation: 23 Dec 2011
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:35547
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  1. Dutt, Amitava Krishna, 1984. "Stagnation, Income Distribution and Monopoly Power," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 8(1), pages 25-40, March.
  2. Rafael La Porta & Florencio Lopez-de-Silane & Andrei Shleifer & Robert W. Vishny, 1996. "Law and Finance," NBER Working Papers 5661, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Edward F. Blackburne III & Mark W. Frank, 2007. "Estimation of nonstationary heterogeneous panels," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 7(2), pages 197-208, June.
  4. Pesaran, M. Hashem & Smith, Ron, 1995. "Estimating long-run relationships from dynamic heterogeneous panels," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 79-113, July.
  5. Simon DEAKIN & Priya LELE & Mathias SIEMS, 2007. "The evolution of labour law: Calibrating and comparing regulatory regimes," International Labour Review, International Labour Organization, vol. 146(3-4), pages 133-162, 09.
  6. Simon Deakin & Prabirjit Sarkar, 2008. "Assessing the Long-Run Economic Impact of Labour Law Systems: A theoretical Reappraisal and Analysis of New Time Series Data," ESRC Centre for Business Research - Working Papers wp367, ESRC Centre for Business Research.
  7. Baker, Dean & Glyn, Andrew & Howell, David & Schmitt, John, 2004. "Unemployment and labour market institutions : the failure of the empirical case for deregulation," ILO Working Papers 374124, International Labour Organization.
  8. Sarkar, Prabirjit, 2011. "Indian Labour Regulation and Its Impact on Unemployment: A Leximetric Study, 1970-2006," MPRA Paper 32929, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  9. Danielle Venn, 2009. "Legislation, Collective Bargaining and Enforcement: Updating the OECD Employment Protection Indicators," OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers 89, OECD Publishing.
  10. Aditya Bhattacharjea, 2006. "Labour Market Regulation and Industrial Performance in India--A Critical Review of the Empirical Evidence," Working papers 141, Centre for Development Economics, Delhi School of Economics.
  11. Steindl, Josef, 1979. "Stagnation Theory and Stagnation Policy," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 3(1), pages 1-14, March.
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