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La transformation postsocialiste chinoise : ouverture économique et contrainte extérieure
[Chinese postsocialist transformation: economic opening and external constraint]

Author

Listed:
  • El Karouni, Ilyess
  • Charles, Sébastien

Abstract

This article is an attempt to show that China's post-socialist transformation involved a change in its growth regime. Indeed, during the Maoist era, it took the form of a "forced growth" as theorized by Kornai (1972). In addition, "export aversion" was one of the main characteristics of Chinese external economic relations. Today, it is not the case anymore since China follows an export-led growth strategy. Nevertheless, this situation could be particularly difficult to manage with respect to its dependence on external demand in a context of low domestic-demand.

Suggested Citation

  • El Karouni, Ilyess & Charles, Sébastien, 2007. "La transformation postsocialiste chinoise : ouverture économique et contrainte extérieure
    [Chinese postsocialist transformation: economic opening and external constraint]
    ," MPRA Paper 3102, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:3102
    as

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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/3102/1/MPRA_paper_3102.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Jànos Kornai, 2000. "What the Change of System from Socialism to Capitalism Does and Does Not Mean," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 14(1), pages 27-42, Winter.
    2. McMillan, John & Naughton, Barry, 1992. "How to Reform a Planned Economy: Lessons from China," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 8(1), pages 130-143, Spring.
    3. Franco Modigliani & Shi Larry Cao, 2004. "The Chinese Saving Puzzle and the Life-Cycle Hypothesis," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 42(1), pages 145-170, March.
    4. Robert M. Solow, 1956. "A Contribution to the Theory of Economic Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 70(1), pages 65-94.
    5. Gérard Roland, 2004. "Transition and Economics: Politics, Markets, and Firms," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 026268148x, January.
    6. Marcos D. Chamon & Eswar S. Prasad, 2010. "Why Are Saving Rates of Urban Households in China Rising?," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 2(1), pages 93-130, January.
    7. Olivier Blanchard & Francesco Giavazzi, 2006. "Rebalancing Growth in China: A Three-Handed Approach," China & World Economy, Institute of World Economics and Politics, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, vol. 14(4), pages 1-20.
    8. Kornai, J, 1979. "Resource-Constrained versus Demand-Constrained Systems," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 47(4), pages 801-819, July.
    9. János Kornai, 2014. "The soft budget constraint," Acta Oeconomica, Akadémiai Kiadó, Hungary, vol. 64(supplemen), pages 25-79, November.
    10. David Cass, 1965. "Optimum Growth in an Aggregative Model of Capital Accumulation," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 32(3), pages 233-240.
    11. Olena Havrylchyk, 2005. "L'avancée des réformes bancaires chinoises," La Lettre du CEPII, CEPII research center, issue 248.
    12. Kornai, Janos, 1992. "The Socialist System: The Political Economy of Communism," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198287766.
    13. Oecd, 2010. "Country Review: Chinese Taipei," OECD Journal: Competition Law and Policy, OECD Publishing, vol. 10(2), pages 127-165.
    14. Lin, Justin Yifu & Yang, Dennis Tao, 1998. "On the causes of China's agricultural crisis and the great leap famine," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 9(2), pages 125-140.
    15. A. P. Thirlwall, 2002. "The Nature of Economic Growth," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 2579.
    16. Felipe, Jesus & Lim, Joseph Anthony, 2005. "Export or Domestic-led Growth in Asia?," Asian Development Review, Asian Development Bank, vol. 22(2), pages 35-75.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Changement institutionnel; transformation postsocialiste; Chine; export-led growth;

    JEL classification:

    • F19 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Other
    • B52 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Current Heterodox Approaches - - - Historical; Institutional; Evolutionary
    • P33 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Institutions and Their Transitions - - - International Trade, Finance, Investment, Relations, and Aid

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