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Estimating the Impacts of Climate Change on Mortality in OECD Countries

Author

Listed:
  • Chen, Ping-Yu
  • Chang, Chia-Lin
  • Chen, Chi-Chung

Abstract

The major contribution of this study is to combines both climatic and macroeconomic factors simultaneously in the estimation of mortality using the capital city of 22 OECD countries from the period 1990 to 2008. The empirical results provide strong evidences that higher income and a lower unemployment rate could reduce mortality rates, while the increases in precipitation and temperature variation have significantly positive impacts on the mortality rates. The effects of changing average temperature on mortality rates in summer and winter are asymmetrical and also depend on the location. Combining the future climate change scenarios with the estimation outcomes show that mortality rates in OECD countries in 2100 will be increased by 3.77% to 5.89%.

Suggested Citation

  • Chen, Ping-Yu & Chang, Chia-Lin & Chen, Chi-Chung, 2010. "Estimating the Impacts of Climate Change on Mortality in OECD Countries," MPRA Paper 27915, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:27915
    as

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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/27915/1/MPRA_paper_27915.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Ulf-G. Gerdtham & Magnus Johannesson, 2004. "Absolute Income, Relative Income, Income Inequality, and Mortality," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 39(1).
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    3. Buckley, Neil J. & Denton, Frank T. & Leslie Robb, A. & Spencer, Byron G., 2004. "The transition from good to poor health: an econometric study of the older population," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, pages 1013-1034.
    4. repec:aph:ajpbhl:1995:85:10:1397-1401_6 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Burr, Jeffrey A. & McCall, Patricia L. & Powell-Griner, Eve, 1997. "Female labor force participation and suicide," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 44(12), pages 1847-1859, June.
    6. Kyung-So Im & Junsoo Lee & Margie Tieslau, 2005. "Panel LM Unit-root Tests with Level Shifts," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 67(3), pages 393-419, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Climate change; mortality; panel data model;

    JEL classification:

    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming

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