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The Impact of Oil Shocks on Qatar’s GDP


  • Al-mulali, Usama
  • Che Sab, Che Normee


This study examines the impact of oil shocks on Qatar’s gross domestic product using time series data from the period 1970-2007 covering all the oil shocks. The Johansen-Juselius (JJ) cointegration test and VECM Granger causality test are employed in this study. From the results we concluded that oil price has a positive effect on Qatar’s gross domestic product, but at the expense of higher inflation. Qatar seems to have suffered from financial surpluses and rapid economic growth caused by sharp increases in the oil price. At the same time, with a fixed exchange regime and tight monetary policy to deal with these events, this has caused the price of assets to increase sharply, leading to high levels of inflation in Qatar. Based on the results, we recommend that the Qatari currency (riyal) be pegged to a basket of currencies so as to increase the role of monetary policy to deal with the external shocks (oil shocks).

Suggested Citation

  • Al-mulali, Usama & Che Sab, Che Normee, 2010. "The Impact of Oil Shocks on Qatar’s GDP," MPRA Paper 27822, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 31 Dec 2010.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:27822

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Meysam Azizi Kouchaksaraei & Hamed Movahedizadeh & Hoda Mohammadalikhani, 2016. "Determinant of the Relationship between Natural Gas Prices and Leading Natural Gas Countries¡¯ Stock Exchange," International Journal of Economics and Finance, Canadian Center of Science and Education, vol. 8(4), pages 246-253, April.

    More about this item


    Qatar; Oil Shocks; GDP; VAR model;

    JEL classification:

    • E00 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General - - - General
    • Q4 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy

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