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Interrelations between Education, Health, Income and Economic Development in Europe with Emphasis on New Members of European Union

Author

Listed:
  • Boboc, Cristina
  • Driouchi, Ahmed
  • Titan, Emilia

Abstract

This study looks at how health, education, and economic development are inter-related in the case of Europe. Factorial analyses besides econometric models, implemented on a panel data from EUROSTAT show that the included variables are interrelated. The new members of the European Union are found to be investing in education, research and development and health care. Furthermore, they have high economic growth and high improvements in education and health state indicators. However, the instability and economic risks that have appeared during the transition process do affect the level of social protection. The existing social protection system increases poverty rates and slows the convergence towards developed economies. Two main directions for enhancing human development in EU new member economies are identified. They include the strengthening of the social protection system to target the vulnerable members affected by the transition process besides increasing expenditure on research and development.

Suggested Citation

  • Boboc, Cristina & Driouchi, Ahmed & Titan, Emilia, 2010. "Interrelations between Education, Health, Income and Economic Development in Europe with Emphasis on New Members of European Union," MPRA Paper 22235, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 19 Apr 2010.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:22235
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/22235/2/MPRA_paper_22235.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Interdependencies; Health; Education; Economic Development;

    JEL classification:

    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution

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