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The Effects of Real Exchange Rate on Trade Balance in Cote d’Ivoire: Evidence from the Cointegration Analysis and Error-Correction Models

  • Drama, Bedi Guy Herve
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    This paper investigates the effect of real exchange rate on the balance of trade of Cote d’Ivoire using multivariate cointegration tests and vector error correction models with time series data covering the periods of 1975-2007. Our investigation results confirm the existence of long-run relationships among Trade Balance(TB), Real Exchange Rate(RER), and foreign and domestic incomes for Cote d’Ivoire. Estimated results also demonstrate that the (RER) has a significant positive influence on Cote d’Ivoire’s trade balance in both short and long-run under fixed real exchange rate management policies for the considering period. The Granger Causality test shows that the (RER) does Granger causes the trade balance then, based on the estimations, the Marshall-Lerner condition in Cote d’Ivoire’s data is explored by utilizing the Impulse Response Function (IFR) which traces the effect of (RER) on the trade balance viewing the J-curve pattern.

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    Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 21810.

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    Date of creation: 02 Apr 2010
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    Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:21810
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    1. Singh, Tarlok, 2002. "India's trade balance: the role of income and exchange rates," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 24(5), pages 437-452, August.
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    6. Hafer, R W & Jansen, Dennis W, 1991. "The Demand for Money in the United States: Evidence from Cointegration Tests," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 23(2), pages 155-68, May.
    7. Rose, Andrew K., 1991. "The role of exchange rates in a popular model of international trade : Does the 'Marshall-Lerner' condition hold?," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(3-4), pages 301-316, May.
    8. Paul Krugman & Marcus Miller, 1992. "Exchange Rate Targets and Currency Bands," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number krug92-1.
    9. Johansen, Soren, 1988. "Statistical analysis of cointegration vectors," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 12(2-3), pages 231-254.
    10. Bahmani-Oskooee, Mohsen & Niroomand, Farhang, 1998. "Long-run price elasticities and the Marshall-Lerner condition revisited," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 61(1), pages 101-109, October.
    11. David A. Dickey & Dennis W. Jansen & Daniel L. Thornton, 1991. "A primer on cointegration with an application to money and income," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Mar, pages 58-78.
    12. Paresh Kumar Narayan, 2004. "New Zealand's trade balance: evidence of the J-curve and granger causality," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(6), pages 351-354.
    13. Dornbusch, Rudiger, 1976. "Expectations and Exchange Rate Dynamics," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 84(6), pages 1161-76, December.
    14. Rose, Andrew K. & Yellen, Janet L., 1989. "Is there a J-curve?," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(1), pages 53-68, July.
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