IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/pra/mprapa/19539.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

The Indigenous Heterogeneity of Oportunidades: Ample or Insufficient Human Capital Accumulation?

Author

Listed:
  • Quiñones, Esteban J.

Abstract

Indigenous groups account for over one tenth of Mexico’s population and many of them suffer from constant social disadvantages and extreme marginalization. One of their few paths out of poverty is through the accumulation of human capital, which is a central element of Oportunidades’ strategy to ameliorate trans-generational poverty. This study finds that the positive impacts of Oportunidades on enrollment for the general population are no different for indigenous households. In addition, it finds that Oportunidades impacts on repeat and illness rates are consistently marginal. Thus, it is argued that unless tailored investment in indigenous human capital accumulation and complimentary alternatives are intensified to close the existing indigenous marginalization gaps, indigenous Mexicans will remain in profound and persistent poverty due to the unique and overwhelming obstacles they face.

Suggested Citation

  • Quiñones, Esteban J., 2006. "The Indigenous Heterogeneity of Oportunidades: Ample or Insufficient Human Capital Accumulation?," MPRA Paper 19539, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:19539
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/19539/1/MPRA_paper_19539.pdf
    File Function: original version
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Emmanuel Skoufias & Susan Wendy Parker, 2001. "Conditional Cash Transfers and Their Impact on Child Work and Schooling: Evidence from the PROGRESA Program in Mexico," Economía Journal, The Latin American and Caribbean Economic Association - LACEA, vol. 0(Fall 2001), pages 45-96, August.
    2. Gordon H. Hanson, 2007. "Globalization, Labor Income, and Poverty in Mexico," NBER Chapters, in: Globalization and Poverty, pages 417-456, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Hoddinott, John & Skoufias, Emmanuel, 2004. "The Impact of PROGRESA on Food Consumption," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 53(1), pages 37-61, October.
    4. Lipton, Michael & Ravallion, Martin, 1995. "Poverty and policy," Handbook of Development Economics, in: Hollis Chenery & T.N. Srinivasan (ed.), Handbook of Development Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 41, pages 2551-2657, Elsevier.
    5. Parker, Susan W & Rubalcava, Luis & Teruel, Graciela, 2005. "Schooling Inequality and Language Barriers," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 54(1), pages 71-94, October.
    6. Skoufias, Emmanuel & Parker, Susan W., 2001. "Conditional cash transfers and their impact on child work and schooling," FCND briefs 123, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    7. Maluccio, John A., 2005. "Coping with the “coffee crisis” in Central America: The Role of the Nicaraguan Red de Protección Social," FCND discussion papers 188, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    8. McEwan, Patrick J, 2004. "The Indigenous Test Score Gap in Bolivia and Chile," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 53(1), pages 157-190, October.
    9. Psacharopoulos, George, 1992. "Ethnicity, education, and earnings in Bolivia and Guatemala," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1014, The World Bank.
    10. Paul Gertler, 2004. "Do Conditional Cash Transfers Improve Child Health? Evidence from PROGRESA's Control Randomized Experiment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(2), pages 336-341, May.
    11. Skoufias, Emmanuel, 2005. "PROGRESA and its impacts on the welfare of rural households in Mexico:," Research reports 139, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Quiñones, Esteban J. & Roy, Shalini, 2016. "The impact of conditional cash transfer programs on indigenous households in Latin America: Evidence from PROGRESA in Mexico:," IFPRI discussion papers 1511, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Sosa-Rubí, Sandra G. & Galárraga, Omar & Harris, Jeffrey E., 2009. "Heterogeneous impact of the "Seguro Popular" program on the utilization of obstetrical services in Mexico, 2001-2006: A multinomial probit model with a discrete endogenous variable," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 20-34, January.
    2. Paul J. Gertler & Sebastian W. Martinez & Marta Rubio-Codina, 2012. "Investing Cash Transfers to Raise Long-Term Living Standards," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 4(1), pages 164-192, January.
    3. Achyuta Adhvaryu & Anant Nyshadham & Teresa Molina & Jorge Tamayo, 2018. "Helping Children Catch Up: Early Life Shocks and the PROGRESA Experiment," NBER Working Papers 24848, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Molina, Teresa & Vidiella-Martin, Joaquim, 2021. "Conditional Cash Transfers and Labor Market Conditions," IZA Discussion Papers 14667, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    5. Barrientos, Armando, 2012. "Social Transfers and Growth: What Do We Know? What Do We Need to Find Out?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 11-20.
    6. Manley, James & Gitter, Seth & Slavchevska, Vanya, 2013. "How Effective are Cash Transfers at Improving Nutritional Status?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 133-155.
    7. Tommasi, Denni, 2019. "Control of resources, bargaining power and the demand of food: Evidence from PROGRESA," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 161(C), pages 265-286.
    8. Bando, Rosangela & Lopez-Calva, Luis F. & Patrinos, Harry Anthony, 2005. "Child labor, school attendance, and indigenous households : evidence from Mexico," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3487, The World Bank.
    9. Reggio, Iliana, 2011. "The influence of the mother's power on her child's labor in Mexico," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(1), pages 95-105, September.
    10. Seth R. Gitter & Bradford L. Barham, 2008. "Women's Power, Conditional Cash Transfers, and Schooling in Nicaragua," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 22(2), pages 271-290, May.
    11. Jacobus de Hoop & Jed Friedman & Eeshani Kandpal & Furio C. Rosati, 2019. "Child Schooling and Child Work in the Presence of a Partial Education Subsidy," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 54(2), pages 503-531.
    12. Miguel Nino-Zarazua, 2011. "Mexico’s Progresa-Oportunidades and the emergence of Social Assistance in Latin America," Global Development Institute Working Paper Series 14211, GDI, The University of Manchester.
    13. Kronebusch, Natalie & Damon, Amy, 2019. "The impact of conditional cash transfers on nutrition outcomes: Experimental evidence from Mexico," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 169-180.
    14. Figueroa, José Luis, 2014. "Distributional effects of Oportunidades on early child development," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 113(C), pages 42-49.
    15. Paul J. Gertler & Orie Shelef & Catherine D. Wolfram & Alan Fuchs, 2016. "The Demand for Energy-Using Assets among the World's Rising Middle Classes," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 106(6), pages 1366-1401, June.
    16. Ferdinando Regalía & Leslie Castro, 2007. "Performance-based Incentives for Health: Demand- and Supply-Side Incentives in the Nicaraguan Red de Protección Social," Working Papers 119, Center for Global Development.
    17. Patrinos, Harry Anthony & Skoufias, Emmanuel & Lunde, Trine, 2007. "Indigenous peoples in Latin America : economic opportunities and social networks," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4227, The World Bank.
    18. Angelucci, Manuela & De Giorgi, Giacomo & Rangel, Marcos A. & Rasul, Imran, 2010. "Family networks and school enrolment: Evidence from a randomized social experiment," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(3-4), pages 197-221, April.
    19. Caldes, Natalia & Coady, David & Maluccio, John A., 2006. "The cost of poverty alleviation transfer programs: A comparative analysis of three programs in Latin America," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 34(5), pages 818-837, May.
    20. repec:aru:wpaper:200601 is not listed on IDEAS
    21. Eduardo Rodrigues-Oreggia & Samuel Freije, 2012. "Long term impact of a Cash-Transfers Program on Labor Outcomes of the Rural Youth," CID Working Papers 230, Center for International Development at Harvard University.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Oportunidades; PROGRESSA; Mexico; Indigenous; Human Capital Accumulation; Impact Evaluation;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D63 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Equity, Justice, Inequality, and Other Normative Criteria and Measurement
    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • H43 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods - - - Project Evaluation; Social Discount Rate
    • C01 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - General - - - Econometrics

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:19539. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/vfmunde.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Joachim Winter (email available below). General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/vfmunde.html .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.